creativity is a powerful asset

 

ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING & SITE DESIGN APPROVED PROJECT
CASE STUDY

 

EAGLE CANYON LODGE & ROMATIC COTTAGES
RUIDOSO   ·  NEW MEXICO   ·  USATBNC Edgemon Recreational Resorts USA Eagle Canyon Lodge on the River Ruidoso, WPA Era Architectural Schema, Large Green Roof, Too, New Mexioc, USA Edgemon

Ruidoso is a village in Lincoln County, New Mexico, United States, adjacent to the Lincoln National Forest. The population was 8,029 at the 2010 census. The cities of Ruidoso Downs, Hollywood, Mescalero, and Alto are suburbs of Ruidoso and contribute to the Ruidoso Micropolitan Statistical Area's population of 21,223.

Ruidoso is located at 33°20′29″N 105°39′58″W   [33.341371, -105.666235].  Elevation is 6,920 feet [2,110 m].

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 14.4 square miles [37.2 km²], of which, 14.3 square miles [37.0 km²] of it is land and 0.1 square miles [0.2 km²] of it [0.63%] is water.

SITED ON THE RIO RUIDOSO
[The Noisy River]

The Rio Ruidoso is a 30-mile [48 km] long river located in the Sierra Blanca and Sacramento Mountains in Lincoln County and Otero County, New Mexico in the United States and is part of the Rio Ruidoso Watershed. The Spanish term "ruidoso" translated into English means literally "noisy river".

The headwaters for the Rio Ruidoso are located near the top of the 12,003-foot [3,659 m] peak of the mountain called Sierra Blanca Peak in the rugged Sierra Blanca mountains, which is located within the Mescalero Apache Indian Reservation. From there, the river winds its way down through the Sacramento Mountains, which are part of the Lincoln National Forest and through the village of Ruidoso, which was named after the river. Along its 30-mile [48 km] course, the river drops 6,000 feet [1,800 m] in elevation.

Several fish species live within the waters of the Rio Ruidoso, including: Two species of German brown trout, rainbow trout, brook trout and cutthroat trout.

 

TBNC Edgemon Recreational Resorts WPA Era Architectural Exhibits, End View main Lodge Eagle Canyon on the River Ruidoso, New Mexico, USA

 

TBNC Edgemon Recreational Resorts and Eagle Canyon Lodge, a WPA Era Architectural Exhibit on the Rio Ruidoso, in Ruidoso New Mexico, USA, Lovely Cottages in the Edgemon Forest

 

 

A mountain resort town, Ruidoso lies in the rugged Sierra Blanca mountain range of south central New Mexico, where it merges with the Sacramento Mountains to the south. Ruidoso is a rapidly growing resort community due to the region's alpine scenery, Ruidoso Downs racetrack, and slopes of Ski Apache, the Mescalero Apache Indian-owned ski resort on the 12,000-foot [3,700 m] mountain Sierra Blanca. The tribe also operates the Inn of the Mountain Gods resort in the area, which includes a casino, hotel, and golf course. Ruidoso is the largest community in Lincoln County and serves as the regional economic hub.

Ruidoso has been experiencing explosive growth. Currently, Ruidoso is the 3rd fastest growing city in New Mexico. Massive investment has poured into the town from many developers. Major projects including large housing subdivisions, condos, and retail establishments have altered the face of the once "sleepy mountain community." As a result, the Village is contending with serious questions about the adequacy of the local water supply and zoning enforcement. Like many small communities that have been recently 'discovered', there is an ongoing debate about how best to plan for additional growth.

In December 2006 7% of eligible voters approved a $12.6 million bond issue to finance the expansion and modernization of the local wastewater treatment plant which was built in 1982. The plant is barely adequate to handle the existing population, and does not meet current EPA standards.

The village received its name from the Rio Ruidoso [Spanish for "Noisy River"], a small stream that weaves through the city.

 

TBNC Edgemon Eagle Canyon Lodge Ruidoso, New Mexico USA, Village of Ruidoso Winter Iconic Logo Exhibit

 

 

EAGLE CANYON LODGE ARCHITECTURAL REPRESENTATION

In the Character of the WPA Craftsman Era
Cascadian Architectural Case Study    ·    Timberline Lodge     ·    Mt. Hood    ·    Oregon    ·    United States of America

TBNC Edgemon Recreational Resorts USA eagle Canyon Lodge Architectural Studies Timberline @ Mt. Hood WPA Craftsmen effort USA

Timberline Lodge was built by hundreds of hands eager to work after months or years of unemployment in the 1930s. Ninety percent of the men and women who built and furnished the lodge were hired by the Works Progress Administration [WPA], the federal agency created in 1933 to provide work for the hundreds of thousands of Americans idled by the Great Depression.

The remaining ten percent were foremen employed by Lorenz Brothers, the supervising contractor for the WPA, or U.S. Forest Service personnel. Some of the WPA workers were skilled, such as some of the stonemasons, but others were taught skills to prepare them for jobs in the private sector.

 

The lodge was constructed between 1936 and 1938 as a Works Progress Administration [WPA] project during the Great Depression. Workers used large timbers and local stone, and placed intricately carved decorative elements throughout the building.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt dedicated the Lodge on September 28, 1937. In his remarks, he commented on the reasons for the project:

"This Timberline Lodge marks a venture that was made possible by W.P.A., emergency relief work, in order that we may test the workability of recreational facilities installed by the Government itself and operated under its complete control.

Here, to Mount Hood, will come thousands and thousands of visitors in the coming years. Looking east toward eastern Oregon with its great livestock raising areas, these visitors are going to visualize the relationship between the cattle ranches and the summer ranges in the forests. Looking westward and northward toward Portland and the Columbia River, with their great lumber and other wood using industries, they will understand the part which National Forest timber will play in the support of this important element of northwestern prosperity.

TBNC Edgemon Recreational Resorts Eagle Canyon Lodge Architectural Studies Timberline Lodge Mt. Hood, Oregon, WPA Craftsmen Jobs & History Edgemon USA

Those who will follow us to Timberline Lodge on their holidays and vacations will represent the enjoyment of new opportunities for play in every season of the year. I mention specially every season of the year because we, as a nation, I think, are coming to realize that the summer is not the only time for play. I look forward to the day when many, many people from this region of the Nation are going to come here for skiing and tobogganing and various other forms of winter sports."


The dedication ceremony was five months before completion of the lodge interior February 1938, when it opened to the public. It took extra expense and effort to make the lodge appear presentable for the dedication.

Timberline Lodge is a living museum of arts and crafts inspired by pioneer, Indian and wildlife themes. The Friends of Timberline, a non-profit organization stated in 1975, has restored or faithfully recreated its furnishings and decorations according to plans and photos from the original project, using donations, time and skills of members, regional arts and craftspeople.

In a state known for its rugged natural beauty, Timberline Lodge is a fitting monument to the pioneer spirit. Perched at the 6,000 foot level of snow-capped Mt. Hood, it is a grand example of Cascadian architecture. The Works Progress Administration built the lodge during the great Depression, employing hundreds of craftsmen. Inside and out the lodge is handmade: from its massive, hand-hewn beams to its hand-woven draperies.

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

REPRESENTATIONAL SITE DEVELOPMENT WORKING PLAN SET
VILLAGE OF RUIDOSO PLANNING DEPARTMENT PROJECT APPROVAL
TEN [10] EXHIBIT DISCUSSION SHEETS
ORIGIN:  THIRTY [30] SHEET VILLAGE OF RUIDOSO APPROVAL MASTER SERIES, INCLUDING ADDENDA

 

REDUCED PLAN SHEETS EXHIBIT SERIES

FULL DIMENSION SHEETS AVAILABLE FOR FURTHER REVIEW
CONTACT TBNC CORPORATE OFFICE   ·  CARLSBAD   ·  CALIFORNIA   ·   USA

    

01 / 28    SITE PLAN EXISTING CONDITIONS RECORDING

 

KEY

FILE REF DOCS

A+E COMMENTARY  ·  ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS  ·  VoR CONDITIONS OF APPROVAL

01.28.SPRH.EC.01

Centrally Located Village of Ruidoso Fire Protection Facility. Nearby Immediate Response Capabilities.

01.28.SPRHEC.02

Project Primary Service and Access Drive, Supplemented with Improved Deceleration Lane, Enhanced Signage.

01.28.SPRHEC.03

Project Southerly Access in Support of EMS / Fire Management and Community and Romantic Cottages Parking.

01.28.SPRHEC.04

Main Lodge Footprint Development and EMS / Fire / Site Safety Accessibility Compliancy. Solid Surface Accessibility.

01.28.SPRHEC.05

Area of Romantic Cottages and Community / Guest Parking Development Supported EMS / Fire / Guest Services Access.

01.28.SPBBEC.01

Enhanced Pedestrian and Eagle Drive Bridge at the Rio Ruidoso, Supplemental ADA Compliant Accessibility.

01.28.SPBBEC.02

Area of Rio Ruidoso Surface Flow Remediation, Removal of Man-Made Diversions and Streamflow Impediment, Typical.

01.28.SPBBEC.03

Rio Ruidoso Flood Inundation Revetment System Developed with Locally-Sourced Natural Stone Boulders.

01.28.SPGCEC.01

Area of Site-Nurtured Existing Forestation and Vegetive Understory. Supplemental Plantings per Landscape Planning.

01.28.SPGCEC.02

Area of Island Existing Forestation and Vegetive Understory. Supplemental Plantings per Landscape Planning, Typical.

01.28.SPGCEC.03

Area of Romantic Cottages Existing Forestation and Vegetive Understory. Supplemental Plantings per Landscape Plan.

01.28.SPOCEC.01

Vicinity Map, Community Circulation and Roadway Systems Exhibit, Village of Ruidoso Site-Central Location.

01.28.SPOCEC.02

Existing and Undisturbed Residential Dwellings Improvements Northeasterly, Elevated Upslope Overlook Conditions.

01.28.SPOCEC.03

Existing and Undisturbed Residential Dwellings [Roswell Street] Northerly, Elevated Upslope Overlook Conditions.

01.28.SPOCEC.04

Existing and Undisturbed Commercial Facilities Southerly, Screen Plantings per Landscape Development Planning.

01.28.SPOCEC.05

Existing and Undisturbed Residential Dwellings Westerly, Screen Plantings per Landscape Development Planning.

01.28.SPBDEC.01

VoR Forestation "Required with Mitigation TAKE" Calculations and Proposed Planning Remediation Schedule.

01.28.SPBDEC.02

Schedule and Identification of Commercial Community Aligned Public Services Providers and Contact Information.

   
   

03 / 28    SITE PLAN PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS PRESENTATION

 

KEY

FILE REF DOCS

A+E COMMENTARY  ·  ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS  ·  VoR CONDITIONS OF APPROVAL

03.28.SPRH.PI.06

Main Lodge EMS / Fire Management Solid Service Accessibility. All Structures Improvements Fully Fire Sprinklered.

03.28.SPRH.PI.07

Main Lodge Porte Cochere EMS / Fire Management Vertical & Horizontal Access Clearance to Federal Standards.

03.28.SPRH.PI.08

Southerly-Sited Romantic Cottages EMS / Fire Management Access Clearance to Standards of The Fire Marshal.

03.28.SPRH.PI.09

Central Island-Sited Conference Centre EMS / Fire Management Access Clearance to Standards of The Fire Marshal.

03.28.SPBBPI.04

Eagle Canyon Lodge Project Site-Northerly NFIP / FEMA / VoR Q100 Flood Inundation Delineation Study Line.

03.28.SPBBPI.05

ECL Romantic Cottages & Parking Project Site-Southerly NFIP / FEMA / VoR Q100 Flood Inundation Delineation Study Line.

03.28.SPBBPI.06

Central Island-Sited Conference Centre Elevated Structural Studies per NFIP / FEMA / VoR Q100 Flood Inundation Study.

03.28.SPOCPI.06

Existing and Undisturbed Residential Dwellings Improvements Northeasterly, Elevated Upslope Overlook Conditions.

03.28.SPOCPI.07

Proposed Good Neighbor Site Security Fencing Improvements at Conjoined Commercial Facilities with Landscaping.

03.28.SPOCPI.08

Fee Title Mappage, Title Recordings Support, Site Configuration Depiction and Project Support Planning Legal Exhibits.

03.28.SPTCPI.01

Main Lodge Site Development Depiction, Guest and Visitors Accessibility and Parking and ADA Compliancies, Typical.

03.28.SPTCPI.02

Romantic Cottages Site-Northerly Development Depiction, Guest Accessibility, Parking and ADA Compliancies.

03.28.SPTCPI.03

Romantic Cottages Site-Southerly Development Depiction, Guest Accessibility, Parking and ADA Compliancies.

03.28.SPTCPI.04

Iconic Eagle Canyon Lodge Overlook Gazebo Vignette and ADA Ramp Accessibility Compliancies, Typical.

03.28.SPTCPI.05

Representational ADA Van Access Vehicle Parking, Signage and Circulation & Rampage Compliancies, Typical.

03.28.SPTCPI.06

Site Circulation, Delineation, Configuration and Minimum Parking Standards per Village of Ruidoso Director of Engineering.

03.28.SPBDPI.03

Site Development Analysis, Land Use Calculations and Schedule of Improvements, Typical.

03.28.SPBDPI.04

Important Plan Set Statement and Planning Focus "Protection of the Rio Ruidoso Environment During Construction".

   
   

04 / 28     SITE PLAN EXPANDED AREA "A" MAIN LODGE

 

KEY

FILE REF DOCS

A+E COMMENTARY  ·  ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS  ·  VoR CONDITIONS OF APPROVAL

04.28.SPRHML.10

All ECL Improvements, Including Porte Cochere and Wedding Chapel Fully Sprinklered and Signal Monitored.

04.28.SPBBML.07

Southeasterly On-Site Rio Ruidoso ADA Compliant Pedestrian & Light Service Vehicle[LSV] Metallic Component Bridge.

04.28.SPBBML.08

Westerly On-Site Rio Ruidoso ADA Compliant Pedestrian & Light Service Vehicle[LSV] Cementitious Component Bridge.

04.28.SPBBML.09

Rio Ruidoso Exposure Cementitious Embedment Revetment System of Locally-Sourced Natural Stone Boulders.

04.28.SPBBML.10

Westerly Off-Site Flood Inundation, Q100 Surface Streamflow Origin and Elevated Central Island Studies.

04.28.SPBBML.11

Representational Site Depiction One [1] of Three [3] On-Site StormChamber™ SWMP Subterranean Storage Reservoirs.

04.28.SPGCML.04

Representational Depiction of Existing & Undisturbed Vegetive Assets [Trees], Nurtured to VoR Forestry Standards.

04.28.SPGCML.05

Representational Depiction of Scheduled Specimen Tree Installations as an Element of the Landscape Planning.

04.28.SPGCML.06

Areas of Significant Erosion Control Methodologies and Vegetive Understory Plantings, per Landscape Planning Schedule.

04.28.SPGCML.07

Areas of Vegetive Groundcovering Plantings and Site Surface Erosion Control & management, per Landscape Planning.

04.28.SPOCML.09

ECL Resort Site-Dedicated Solid Surface Parking Areas, Complete with ADA Van Access and Pedestrian Accessibility.

04.28.SPOCML.10

ECL Resort Enclosed and Secured Refuse Collection and Recycle Management Structure,  Full Site Access, Typical.

04.28.SPTCML.07

Main Lodge Porte Cochere Significant Architectural Element and Weather Protective Shelter/Cover.

04.28.SPTCML.08

ADA Compliant Van Accessible Site-Dedicated Parking with Compliant Signage and Pedestrian Rampage, Typical.

04.28.SPTCML.09

ECL Site Monument Signage, Dusk-to-Dawn Soft-Lit including General Resort Information and Communications Records.

04.28.SPTCML.10

Iconic Eagle Canyon Lodge Overlook Gazebo Vignette and ADA Ramp Accessibility Compliancies, Typical.

04.28.SPTCML11

Linear Rio Ruidoso Riverwalk Improvements to ADA Compliancy, Featuring Benches and Informational Signage.

04.28.SPTCML.12

Iconic Eagle Canyon Lodge Wedding Gazebo at the Central Island. Illuminated for Evening Activities, Typical.

04.28.SPBDML.05

Limited Access Private Drive in Support of Westerly Properties and Access to Public Available Parking Compound.

04.28.SPBDML.06

Existing and Undisturbed VoR Eight [8"] Inch Sewer Main Line & Dedicated and Unmodified Easement, Typical.

04.28.SPBDML.07

Areas of Non-Disruption [Westerly Residential Properties] and Good Neighbor Site Security Fencing Element.

   
   

07 / 28    MAIN LODGE ELEVATION DRAFT & FIRST FLOOR PLAN

 

KEY

FILE REF DOCS

A+E COMMENTARY  ·  ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS  ·  VoR CONDITIONS OF APPROVAL

07.28.SPRHLE.11

Dark Green, Metallic, Class "A" Fire Rated, Ridge-Seamed Roof, Typical of all ECL Structural Improvements.

07.28.SPBBLE.12

Rio Ruidoso Exposure Cementitious Embedment Revetment System of Locally-Sourced Natural Stone Boulders.

07.28.SPGCLE.08

Representational Planting Depiction Ornamental Specimen Tree Plantings & Understory per Landscape Plans.

07.28.SPGCLE.09

Rio Ruidoso Surface Edge Ground Treatment Plantings, Native & Indigenous Varieties per Landscape Development Plans.

07.28.SPOCLE.11

Greater Village of Ruidoso Land Use and Zoning Matrix Exhibit, including Elements of the Linear Parkland Riverwalk.

07.28.SPOCLE.12

ECL Structural Improvements Calculations and Site Specific Land-Use Schedule, Including Community Commentary.

07.28.SPTCLE.13

ECL Architecturally Enhanced, Stone-Clad and Structurally Enhanced Chimney Improvements, Typical all Development.

07.28.SPTCLE.14

Depiction, ECL Fire Rated "A" , Cementitious Panelized Surface Siding Elements, Including Architectural Accoutrement.

07.28.SPTCLE.15

Manufacturers' Technical Data, ECL Fire Rated "A" , Cementitious Panelized Surface Siding Elements,Typical.

07.28.SPTCLE.16

Representational Manufactured Ledgestone Component, Fire Rated "A" Methodology and Architectural Amenity.

07.28.SPTCLE.17

Dark Green, Metallic, Class "A" Fire Rated, Ridge-Seamed Roof, Typical of all ECL Structural Improvements.

07.28.SPTCLE.18

Pedestrian Guests and Visitors ADA Compliant Rampage, Surface Applications and Prototypical Signage, Typical.

07.28.SPBDLE.08

VoR Planning Department Approval Roof Summit Height Variance to Enhance Architectural Ambience, Typical.

07.28.SPBDLE.09

Important Plan Set Statement and Planning Focus "Protection of the Rio Ruidoso Environment During Construction".

     
     

08 / 28    MAIN LODGE EASTERLY ELEVATION & THIRD FLOOR PLAN

 

KEY

FILE REF DOCS

A+E COMMENTARY  ·  ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS  ·  VoR CONDITIONS OF APPROVAL

08.28.SPRHTF.12

Main Lodge EMS / Fire Management Solid Service Accessibility. Structural Access Clearance per Federal Standards.

08.28.SPRHTF.13

Class "A" Fire Rated, Dark Green, Metallic, Standing Ridge-Seamed Roof, Typical of all ECL Structural Improvements.

08.28.SPRHTF.14

Structurally and Architecturally Enhanced, Stone-Clad and Fire Rated Chimney Improvements, Typical all Development.

08.28.SPRHTF.15

VoR Department of Forestry Firewise Rated Existing and Proposed Landscape Improvement and Plantings, Typical.

08.28.SPBBTF.13

Section Depiction of the Rio Ruidoso Stableflow Volumes-Line Laterally Traversing the ECL Main Lodge.

08.28.SPGCTF.10

Representational Native and Area Indigenous Landscape Ground cover Plantings per VoR Department of Forestry.

08.28.SPGCTF.11

Representational Native and Area Indigenous Existing and Specimen Tree Plantings per VoR Department of Forestry.

08.28.SPOCTF.13

ADA Compliant Site Circulation and Accessibility, Surface Applications, Gradients and Landings per Federal Standards

08.28.SPTCTF.19

Representational ECL Main Lodge Belvederes and Balconies, Suite ADA Compliancy Accessibility, Typical.

08.28.SPTCTF.20

Main Lodge Third Level, Enclosed and Sprinklered Mechanical and Utilities Rooms with Emergency Egress Capabilities.

08.28.SPBDTF.09

Important Plan Set Statement and Planning Focus "Protection of the Rio Ruidoso Environment During Construction".

     
     

10 / 28     ROMANTIC COTTAGES ELEVATION STUDY & FLOOR PLANS

 

KEY

FILE REF DOCS

A+E COMMENTARY  ·  ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS  ·  VoR CONDITIONS OF APPROVAL

10.28.SPRHRC.16

All ECL Improvements, Including Porte Cochere and Wedding Chapel Fully Sprinklered and Signal Monitored.

10.28.SPBBRC.14

Site Plan Depiction and Notes of the Rio Ruidoso Stableflow Laterally Traversing the Island Sited Conference Centre.

10.28.SPBBRC.15

Positive Rainwater Management via Gutters and Downspouts to StormChamber™ Aquifer Recharge System, Typical.

10.28.SPBBRC.16

NFIP / FEMA / FIRM Schedules VoR Flood Inundation Notes, Commentary and General Depiction Exhibits.

10.28.SPGCRC.12

Representational Native and Area Indigenous Existing and Specimen Tree Plantings per VoR Department of Forestry.

10.28.SPOCRC.14

Proposed ECL, Romantic Cottages and Ancillary Structures Project Site Footprint Analysis and Area Calculations Exhibits.

10.28.SPOCRC.15

Romantic Cottages in Inundation Sheetflow Line NFIP / FEMA / FIRM Schedules VoR Flood Inundation Notes Exhibits.

10.28.SPTCRC.21

Prototypical Sub-Surface Water Membrane Barrier at Romantic Cottages Structural Component Retaining Walls, Typical.

10.28.SPTCRC.22

Representational ECL Fire Rated "A" , Cementitious Panelized Surface Siding, Including Architectural Accoutrement.

10.28.SPTCRC.23

Representational Class "A" Metal Standing Seam Roof and Snow Guard Systems and Hardware Exhibits.

10.28.SPTCRC.24

Representational Site-Defined Structural Retaining Wall Detail and General Specifications Exhibit.

10.28.SPTCRC.25

Conference Center Dedicated and Secured Mechanical, Fire Management and Site Telecommunications Room Exhibit.

10.28.SPBDRC.10

Important Plan Set Statement and Planning Focus "Protection of the Rio Ruidoso Environment During Construction".

     
     

15 / 28     SITE PLAN POTABLE WATER & IRRIGATION CIRCUITRY DEMANDS

 

KEY

FILE REF DOCS

A+E COMMENTARY  ·  ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS  ·  VoR CONDITIONS OF APPROVAL

15.28.SPRHPW.17

EMS / Fire Management & Site Service Circulation and Obstruction Free Accessibility. Guests and Visitor Accessibility.

15.28.SPBBPW.17

Project Site SWMP Source Origins Management and Positive Flow Control to StormChambers™ Systems, Typical.

15.28.SPBBPW.18

Representation Depiction Potable Water Distribution System, Community Provided Origin and Measured Services, Typical.

15.28.SPBBPW.19

Representational Depiction of Three [3] Subterranean SWMP StormChamber™ Systems with Positive Flow Collection.

15.28.SPGCPW.13

Prototypical Irrigation System Installation Details; Trench Depth and Width, Backfill and Soils Applications, Typical.

15.28.SPGCPW.14

Prototypical Irrigation System Installation Details; Hardware and Site Specific Water Conserving Applications, Typical.

15.28.SPOCPW.16

CMU Enclosed Refuse Station with Weather Protective Roof; Circulation Accessibility by Commercial Service Provider.

15.28.SPOCPW.17

Romantic Cottages and Conference Centre Guest & Visitor Parking Area, Improved with Granular Aggregate Surface.

15.28.SPOCPW.18

Public Welcomed, Community Access Parking Area, Improved with Pea-Sized Granular Aggregate Surface, Typical.

15.28.SPOCPW.19

Rio Ruidoso Linear Parkland "Riverwalk" Element, Surface with Stabilized ADA Compliant Granular Application, Typical.

15.28.SPOCPW.20

Dedicated by Fee Title Prescription; "Wilson" Limited Access Drive Easement Conjoined with Riverwalk Improvements.

15.28.SPTCPW.26

Site Depiction Eagle Canyon Main Lodge and Circulation Access Parallel the Stable Conditions [Non-Inundation] Riverflow.

15.28.SPTCPW.27

Romantic Cottages Site Depiction Northerly and Southerly Series and ADA Compliant Circulation Accessibility.

15.28.SPBDPW.21

Important Plan Set Statement and Planning Focus "Protection of the Rio Ruidoso Environment During Construction".

     
     

18 / 28  SITE PLAN  SITE SECURITY LIGHTING & SITE SIGNAGE PLANNING 

 

KEY

FILE REF DOCS

A+E COMMENTARY  ·  ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS  ·  VoR CONDITIONS OF APPROVAL

18.28.SPRHSS.18

Site Security Lighting Systems, Dusk-to-Dawn Control, Shielded Panel to Neighbors When Practical, Typical.

18.28.SPRHSS.19

Site Security and Resort Circulation Signage and Placards, Emergency and Project Contact Numbers, Typical.

18.28.SPRHSS.20

Site Security and Circulation Illuminators Schedule, Representational Control Systems Tables and Time of Action.

18.28.SPBBSS.20

Rio Ruidoso & Linear Parklands "Riverwalk" Visitor and Guest General Informational Signage, Placards and Safety Notes.

18.28.SPBBSS.21

ADA Compliant Rio Ruidoso Passage Bridges Supporting Pedestrian and Light Vehicle Use [LVU], Typical of Two [2].

18.28.SPBBSS.22

Rio Ruidoso Flowline Southeasterly of Eagle Drive Bridge; Undisturbed by this Development, Typical.

18.28.SPGCSS.15

Project Existing and Expanded Forestation Site Security Up-Lighting Elements, Details and Control Schedules, Typical.

18.28.SPOCSS.21

Site Circulation Depiction including Access to Guests and Public-Use Parking and EMS / Fire Marshal Requirements.

18.28.SPOCSS.22

Linear Development of the Signature Section of the "Riverwalk" with Directional Control Bollards and Safety Signage.

18.28.SPTCSS.28

Representational Depiction Main Element Eagle Canyon Lodge Monument Signage and General Resort Information,

18.28.SPBDSS.12

Representational Shielded Site Security Lighting Systems Methodologies, Notes, Details and General Conditions.

     
     

21 / 28   NAIL WALL & FAUX WALL EROSION CONTROL SYSTEMS

 

KEY

FILE REF DOCS

A+E COMMENTARY  ·  ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS  ·  VoR CONDITIONS OF APPROVAL

21.28.SPRHEC.21

EMS / Fire Management & Site Service Circulation and Obstruction Free Accessibility. Guests and Visitor Accessibility.

21.28.SPBBEC.23

Offsite Origin Significant SWMP and Hydrology Sheetflow Waters Control Management, Positive Drainage Collection.

21.28.SPBBEC.23

Positive Control Sheetflow Waters Collector Basins and Interconnection to Subterranean StormChamber™ System.

21.28.SPGCEC.18

Representational Surface Application Erosion Control Eco-matting and Embedded Vegetive Plantings, Typical all Slopes.

21.28.SPOCEC.23

ADA Compliant, Abrasive Texture, Solid Surface Rampage to Iconic Gazebo Vignette with Mid-Station Landings, Typical.

21.28.SPOCEC.24

Geotechnically Engineered, Nail Wall with Structural  Category Manufactured [Faux] Stone Application, Typical.

21.28.SPOCEC.24

Geotechnically Engineered, Segmental Component Retaining Wall with Embedded Geogrid Stabilization, Typical.

21.28.SPTCEC.29

Structurally Enhanced, Manufactured Stone Waterfeature Element; Self Contained and Filtered Hydrological System.

21.28.SPBDEC.13

Erosion and Slope Control Retaining Walls General Specifications and Inventory of Details / Conditions, Typical.

21.28.SPBDEC.13

Important Plan Set Statement and Planning Focus "Protection of the Rio Ruidoso Environment During Construction".

     
     

23 / 28   AREA "A" MAIN LODGE LANDSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS WITH TREES

 

KEY

FILE REF DOCS

A+E COMMENTARY  ·  ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS  ·  VoR CONDITIONS OF APPROVAL

23.28.SPRHLI.22

ECL & Cottages EMS / Fire Management Solid Service Accessibility. Structural Access Clearance per Federal Standards.

23.28.SPRHLI.23

Rio Ruidoso Passage Bridges Providing EMS / Fire Management / Site Services & Maintenance Accessibility.

23.28.SPRHLI.24

Dedicated Use-Specific "Wilson" Limited Access Easement Providing EMS / Fire Management / Site Services Westerly.

23.28.SPBBLI.25

Stabilized and Undisturbed Rio Ruidoso Riverflow Bisecting the Eagle Canyon Lodge Project Easterly to Westerly, Typical.

23.28.SPBBLI.25

Existing and Undisturbed Surface Stormwater Sheetflow Conditions; Managed as SWMP and Aquifer Recharge, Typical.

23.28.SPGCLI.17

Existing Forestation Inventory to be Protected, Nurtured and Enhanced per VoR Forestry Department, Typical.

23.28.SPGCLI.18

New Plantings of Native and Area Indigenous Specimen Trees, Shrubs and Ground Covering Understory Vegetation.

23.28.SPGCLI.19

Representational Vegetive Palette of Native and Area Indigenous Specimen Trees, Shrubs and Understory Vegetation.

23.28.SPOCLI.26

Site Specific ADA Compliant Access; Solid Surface and Granular Aggregate Application to Federal Guidelines, Typical.

23.28.SPOCLI.27

Good Neighbor, Site Security Fencing Set at Property Line Interior Eight [8"] Inches, Not to Exceed Six [6'] Feet, Typical.

23.28.SPTCLI.30

Site Specific, Solid Surface [Paved / Cementitious] Guest Parking Areas with Positive SWMP Surface Sheetflow Control.

23.28.SPTCLI.31

Architecturally Enhanced Property Line Sited CMU Stucco Clad Designer / Delineation Walls with Pilasters, Typical.

23.28.SPTCLI.32

Architecturally Enhanced CMU Stucco Clad Designer Style Monument Signage with Brick Trim Accoutrement, Typical.

23.28.SPTCLI.33

Central Island Sited Architecturally Enhanced Wedding & Functionary Gazebo with Green Metal Standing Seam Roof.

23.28.SPTCLI.34

Mid-Development Site Depiction of the Eagle Canyon Main Lodge, Conjoined Parking and Guest Accessibility, Typical.

23.28.SPBDLI.15

Important Plan Set Statement and Planning Focus "Protection of the Rio Ruidoso Environment During Construction".

23.28.SPBDLI.16

Representational Draft Planning of the Proposed Eagle Drive Deceleration Lane Improvements and Subsequent Signage.

     

 

 

 

 

 

TBNC Eagle Canyon Lodge Linear Waterwall Land + waterworks Ruidoso new Mexico USA

 

ENGINEERED SOIL NAILING APPLICATION SUPPORTING MANUFACTURED STONE

VISIT CHANCE SOIL ENGINEERING AT OFF SITE WEB PRESENCE
@
 www.abchance.com

ENGINEERED SOIL NAILING APPLICATION

Soil nailing is a construction technique that can be used as a remedial measure to treat unstable natural soil slopes or as a construction technique that allows the safe over-steepening of new or existing soil slopes. The technique involves the insertion of relatively slender reinforcing elements into the slope – often general purpose reinforcing bars [rebar] although proprietary solid or hollow-system bars are also available. Solid bars are usually installed into pre-drilled holes and then grouted into place using a separate grout line, whereas hollow bars may be drilled and grouted simultaneously by the use of a sacrificial drill bit and by pumping grout down the hollow bar as drilling progresses. Kinetic methods of firing relatively short bars into soil slopes have also been developed. Bars installed using drilling techniques are usually fully grouted and installed at a slight downward inclination with bars installed at regularly spaced points across the slope face. A rigid facing [often pneumatically applied concrete, otherwise known as shotcrete] or isolated soil nail head plates may be used at the surface. Alternatively a flexible reinforcing mesh may be held against the soil face beneath the head plates. Rabbit proof wire mesh and environmental erosion control fabrics and may be used in conjunction with flexible mesh facing where environmental conditions dictate.

REPRESENTATIONAL MECHANICAL APPLICATION

 

Soil nail components may also be used to stabilize retaining walls or existing fill slopes [embankments];  this is normally undertaken as a remedial measure.

Since its first application using modern techniques in Versailles in 1972, soil nailing is now a well-established technique around the world. One of the first national guideline publications for soil nailing was produced in Japan in 1987. The U.S. Federal Highway Administration issued guideline publications in 1996 and 2003.

REPRESENTATIONAL PROGRESSIVE CONSTRUCTION REORDINGS

 

ORIGINATION DISCUSSION

Soil Nailing evolved from the New Austrian Tunneling method which is a system for underground excavations in rock. This method consists of passive steel reinforcement in the rock followed by the application of reinforced shotcrete. This concept of combining passive steel reinforcement and shotcrete has also been applied to the stabilization of rock slopes since the early 1960s.

The first application of soil nailing was implemented in 1972 for a railroad widening project near Versailles, France. Soil nails were used to stabilize an eighteen [18] metre [m] high slope consisting of sandy soil. This method proved to be more cost-effective, while at the same time cut down the construction time when compared to other conventional support methods. Germany was the next country to investigate soil nailing. From 1975-1981 the University of Karlsruhe and the construction company Baur collaborated to establish a research program. This program conducted full scale testing of experimental walls with different configurations and developed analysis procedures for use in design. The United States first used soil nailing in 1976 for the support of a 13.7 metre deep foundation excavation in dense silty sands.

Soil nailing was implemented in the expansion of The Good Samaritan Hospital in Portland, Oregon. This retaining system was produced in approximately half the time at about 85% of the cost of conventional retaining systems.

 

COST COMPARISON

One great advantage of soil nail walls is their cost-effectiveness over other alternatives. When conventional soil nailing construction procedures are used, soil nail walls are much more economical than concrete gravity walls and similarly or more cost effective than ground anchor walls.

 

 

   

ECL.RNM.TBNC Eagle Canyon Lodge Linera Waterfeature + Waterwall Plan View Draft      

 

 

ENGINEERED SEGMENTAL RETAINING WALL APPLICATION
PROTOTYPICAL MANUFACTURER


4444 West 78th Street • Minneapolis, MN 55435
952. 897.1040

Visit Manufacturer Off Site Web Presence
www.keystonewalls.com

 

Segmental retaining walls consist of modular concrete blocks that interlock with each other. They are used to hold back a sloping face of soil to provide a solid, vertical front. Without adequate retention, slopes can cave, slump or slide. With the unique construction of segmental retaining walls, higher and steeper walls can be constructed with the ability to retain the force of lateral earth pressure created by the backfill soil.

 


Image Credit KEYSTONE©

 

REPRESENTATIONAL SITE DESIGN & APPLICATION
ELEVATED RADIUS TIER SYSTEMS

Typical designs and specifications for segmental retaining walls should be prepared by a designer who has technical knowledge of soil and structural mechanics. Each SRW unit manufacturer can provide design information tailored to that product, which will indicate the wall heights and design conditions when an SRW should be designed by a qualified engineer. In addition, SRW systems should be designed by a qualified engineer when:

Structures will be Surcharged
Walls will be Subjected to Live Loads
W walls will be Founded on Poor Foundation Conditions
The Nature of the Design Conditions Requires Special Consideration

 

REPRESENTATIONAL SITE APPLICATION

 

GEOSYNTHETIC LENGTH AND SPACING CRITERIA

For soil-reinforced segmental retaining walls, geosynthetic reinforcement increases the mass of the composite SRW structure, and therefore increases the resistance to destabilizing forces. Length of the geosynthetic is typically controlled by external stability calculations. Increasing the length of the geosynthetic layers increases the SRW's resistance to overturning, base sliding, and bearing failures. In some instances, the length of the uppermost layer(s) is locally extended in order to provide adequate anchorage (pullout capacity) for the geosynthetic layers. The strength of the geosynthetic and the frictional interaction with the surrounding soil may also affect geosynthetic length.

A sufficient number and strength of geosynthetic layers must be used to satisfy horizontal equilibrium with soil forces behind the wall and to maintain internal stability. In addition, the tension forces in the geosynthetic layers must be less than the design strength of the geosynthetic and within the allowable connection strength between the geosynthetic and the SRW unit.

Drainage System - Drainage is an essential part of a properly designed SRW. Drainage materials are generally well-graded aggregates. A properly designed drainage system relieves hydrostatic pressure in the soil, prevents retained soils from washing through the face of the wall, provides a stiff leveling pad to support a column of stacked facing units, and provides a working surface during construction. Surface water drainage should be designed to minimize erosion of the topsoil in front of the wall toe and to direct surface water away from the structure.

 

SRW REPRESENTATIONAL TIER INSTALLATION APPLICATION

SRW REPRESENTATION GEOGRID APPLICATION

 

For over two decades, Keystone® Retaining Wall Systems, Inc. has set the bar for excellence, innovation, and technology within the industry. Keystone represents the worldwide standard in soil retention, erosion control, and landscape systems. Keystone symbolizes cutting edge design, performance, and aesthetics for all applications within the hardscape industry. Together with premier manufacturers, product developers, engineers and sales professionals, we proudly ensure that Keystone products and services offer the best site solutions for governmental, commercial/industrial, recreational, public works and residential applications.

PROTOTYPICAL POSITIVE MECHANICAL CONNECTION

The Keystone patented pin system provides dependable strength where it's needed most. High-strength fiberglass pins provide built-in alignment for the Keystone Century Wall and ensure that each unit is securely interlocked within the wall face. In addition, this unique retaining wall system allows for a mechanical connection with geogrid soil reinforcement, securing its placement between units and allowing for proper tension and maximum efficiency of the geogrid.

Keystone's extensive family of products offers complete wall solutions that overcome the most challenging site conditions and also lead the industry in product
performance and aesthetics. Visit www.keystonewalls.com for an interactive resource offering the complete design and installation details. It's a one-stop source
for all the Keystone information available.

REPRESENTATIONAL STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS

 

UTILIZATION OF NATURAL AND RECYCLED / RECLAIMED MATERIALS

Concrete is an environmentally friendly building product composed of both natural and recycled materials. Those recycled products include concrete aggregate, fly ash and iron oxide. During production of SRW units, waste concrete is produced. Most manufacturers crush this concrete into aggregate and reuse it, thereby reducing waste material destined for landfills. Fly ash, a waste material produced and then discarded by coal burning plants, is another component used in the manufacture of concrete SRW units. Recycling fly ash in this way keeps it out of landfills. SRW units also utilize synthetic iron oxide to color the units, which is made by burning recycled scrap steel at high temperatures. The natural and recycled materials utilized in the manufacturing process result in an environmentally conscious and efficient construction product.

 

GEOSYNTHETIC GEOGRID STRUCTURAL APPLICATIONS

A geogrid is geosynthetic material used to reinforce soils and similar materials. Geogrids are commonly used to reinforce retaining walls, as well as subbases or subsoils below roads or structures. Soils pull apart under tension. Compared to soil, geogrids are strong in tension. This allows them to transfer forces to a larger area of soil than would otherwise be the case.

Geogrids are commonly made from polymer materials such as polyester or polystyrene. They may be govern or knitted from yarns, heat-welded from strips of material, or produced by punching a regular pattern of holes in sheets of material, then stretched into a grid.

 

 

 

The development of methods of preparing relatively rigid polymeric materials by tensile drawing, in a sense "cold working," raised the possibility that such materials could be used in the reinforcement of soils for walls, steep slopes, roadway bases and foundation soils. Used as such, the major function of the resulting geogrids is in the area of reinforcement. This area, as with many other geosynthetics, is very active, with a number of different products, materials, configurations, etc., making up today's geogrid market. The key feature of all geogrids is that the openings between the adjacent sets of longitudinal and transverse ribs, called “apertures,” are large enough to allow for soil strike-through from one side of the geogrid to the other. The ribs of some geogrids are often quite stiff compared to the fibers of geotextiles. As discussed later, not only is rib strength important, but junction strength is also important. The reason for this is that in anchorage situations the soil strike-through within the apertures bears against the transverse ribs, which transmits the load to the longitudinal ribs via the junctions. The junctions are, of course, where the longitudinal and transverse ribs meet and are connected. They are sometimes called “nodes”.

 

BRIEF DISCRIPTION GEOGRID CATEGORIES

Currently there are three categories of geogrids. The first, and original, geogrids [called unitized or homogeneous types] were invented by Dr. Frank Brian Mercer in the United Kingdom at Netlon, Ltd., and were brought in 1982 to North America by the Tensar Corporation. A conference in 1984 was helpful in bringing geogrids to the engineering design community. A similar type of drawn geogrid which originated in Italy by Tenax is also available, as are products by new manufacturers in Asia.

REPRESENTATIONAL GEOSYNTHETIC GEOGRID FOR SOILS REINFORCEMENT

 

The second category of geogrids are more flexible, textile-like geogrids using bundles of polyethylene-coated polyester fibres as the reinforcing component. They were first developed by ICI Linear Composites LTD in the United Kingdom around 1980. This led to the development of polyester yarn geogrids made on textile weaving machinery. In this process hundreds of continuous fibers are gathered together to form yarns which are woven into longitudinal and transverse ribs with large open spaces between. The cross-overs are joined by knitting or intertwining before the entire unit is protected by a subsequent coating. Bitumen, latex, or PVC are the usual coating materials. Geosynthetics within this group are manufactured by many companies having various trademarked products. There are possibly as many as 25 companies manufacturing coated yarn-type polyester geogrids on a worldwide basis.

The third category of geogrids are made by laser or ultrasonically bonding together polyester or polypropylene rods or straps in a grid-like pattern. Two manufacturers currently make such geogrids.

The geogrid area is extremely active not only in manufacturing new products, but also in providing significant technical information to aid the design engineer.

KEYSTONE© GEOGRID CHART NOTES

The Keystone© geogrid charts are graphically presented to show the proper orientation and lengths of geogrids used with Keystone Century Wall Units at the near vertical and 8.8° setback batter. Design Chart Wall sections are shown to increase in 16-inch (400mm) increments beginning at three [3] feet (0.9m) and ending eleven [11] feet (3.4m). Engineering judgement should be used when interpolating between heights. Heights under three [3] feet (0.9m) in height may require geogrid reinforcement depending upon the units used, soil types, and surcharge loadings. [refer to Gravity Walls Chart].

Soil ranges are selected to approximate good (34°), medium (30°), and poor (26°), soil conditions which span the typical design range. Wall height is the total height of the wall from top of leveling pad to top of wall. All geogrid lengths shown are the actual lengths of geogrid required as measured from the connection pins to the end of the geogrid. The Design Charts assume that the walls are constructed in accordance with Keystone© specifications and good construction practice. All soils should be compacted in maximum 8-inch (200mm) lifts to 95% Standard Proctor density as determined by laboratory testing. The information contained in the Design Charts is for preliminary design use only. A qualified engineer should be consulted for final design assistance. Keystone Retaining Wall Systems, Inc. accepts no liability for the improper use of these charts.

SPECIAL SEGMENTAL RETAINING WALL AESTHETIC APPLICATION NOTES

SEGMENTED RETAINING WALLS ILLUMINATORS EMBEDMENT

REPRESENTATIONAL SRW RADIUS APPLICATION

 

BRIEF TREE PLANTING DETAIL @ SEGMENTED RETAINING WALL APPLICATIONS

Keystone Retaining Wall Systems, Inc. reserves the right to improve its products and make changes to its specification and design without notice. The information contained herein has been compiled by Keystone and to the best of our knowledge, accurately represents the Keystone product and how it may be used in the applications which are illustrated. Site conditions, including load pressures acting on the wall, soil types and drainage conditions, may vary. Final determination of the suitability of the product for the use contemplated and the manner of product use are the sole responsibility of the user. Good construction practices and local building codes require the use of an engineered design when constructing retaining walls or freestanding walls in many conditions. Structural design and analysis should be provided by a qualified engineer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ICONIC PROJECT AMENITY

 

TBNC Edgemon Eagle Canyon Lodge Ruidoso, new Mexico, Kewl Gazebo on a Plinth at waterfeature


TBNC Edgemon Recreational Resorts Eagle Canyon Lodge Ruidodo, New Mexico, Amish Country Gazebos Logo Crediit, USA

Visit Off Site Web Presence
@
www.amishgazebos.com

What makes Amish Country Gazebos better?

Many have tried to copy an authentic Amish Country Gazebo,
but no other company can match the benefits of selecting
an original Amish Country Gazebo

 

TBNC Edgemon Recreational Resorts Eagle Canyon Lodge, Amish Carpenters at Work at Ruidoso, New Mexico on Killer Gazebo. USA

A MUCH BETTER GAZEBO

More Lumber - An Amish Country Gazebo has between 20-30% more lumber than other companies provide. Your vinyl gazebo is equally more substantial.

The best lumber - We use only #1, hand-selected, kiln dried, pressure treated lumber throughout your gazebo. Other companies throw in #2 and #3 grade lumber where they think they can get away with it.

2 x 6 roof rafters - Most companies use 2 x 4’s. An Amish Country Gazebo 2 x 6 rafter is 50% stronger!

1 x 6 tongue & groove ceiling - Many companies use plywood or knotty cedar boards for the ceiling. You cannot beat the beauty and strength of #1, hand-selected, pressure treated lumber for your gazebo ceiling.

2 x 6 floor joists - Some companies use 2 x 4’s. An Amish Country Gazebo 2 x 6 floor joist is 50% stronger!

Screws, not nails - No other gazebo company uses stain-resistant screws throughout the gazebo like Amish Country Gazebos. Other gazebos are made with nails. We use only screws.

Five-step paint process - We are the only gazebo company that uses the exact same paint booth car detailers use to paint expensive cars. This enables us to provide the best gazebo paint job in America. Here are the five steps: [1] hand-sanding [2] prime coat [3] hand-sanding again [4] first coat of paint [5] second coat of paint.

 

 

 

TBNC ECL.RNM Entry Monument Signage Ruidoso New Mexico USA

RESORT PROJECT INFORMATIONAL GRAPHICS
REPRESENTATIONAL EXHIBIT

MONUMENT SIGNAGE

To create a powerful first impression incorporate outdoor architectural signage.

Architectural Monument Signs are a great way to let potential visitors and guests know where you are located. They are always visible, night or day, ready attract new patrons. A monument sign can turn a casual passerby into a valuable repeat visitor just by being noticeable and attractive.

Architectural Monument Signs increase a resort's exposure to the visiting public. They are physical representations of the business and promote the resort's corporate image simply by being where they can be seen by both foot traffic and vehicular traffic.

Architectural Monument Signs are on display twenty-four [24] hours a day, 365 days a year, all seasons and in all kinds of weather conditions. Simple, yet tasteful illumination makes them even more visible, especially at night and from greater distances than non-illuminated signs.

 

   

 

 

 

THE RIVERWALK @ THE RIO RUIDOSO & LINEAR PARKLAND DEVELOPMENT

The Rio Ruidoso is designated as a Cold Water Fishery. The Proposed Riverwalk and Linear Parkland would include interpretation placards describing what a Cold Water Fishery is; the different habitats; different plant species; etc.

TBNC Edgemon Eagle Canyon Lodge Rio Ruidoso River Walk Section Study Ruidoso, New Mexico USA

 

TBNC Edgemon Recreational Resorts Village of Ruidoso Signature Segment Riverwalk Linear Park Eagle Canyon Lodge, USA Edgemon 274107

 

 

 

INITIAL SITE TOPOGRAPHY ANALYSIS   TBNC Edgemon Eagle Canyon Lodge Ruidoso, New Mexico Draft Collins Topography Master USA

TBNC Edgemon Eagle Canyo Lodge ECDrive Alignment & Mitigation Proposal Ruidoso, New Mexico, USA

TBNC Edgemon Eagle Canyon Lodge Texas-New mexio Power Company Site Utilities Study Mappage, Ruidoso, New Mexico, USA

 

 

TBNC Edgemon Eagle Canyon Lodge Site Security Lighting Schedule Draft, ECL.RNM Series 001 Ruidoso, New Mexico, USA

EAGLE CANYON LODGE COMMUNITY INPUT SITE-SECURITY LIGHTING GUIDANCE

1. Security lights should be placed high enough above the ground so intruders cannot disable them.   2. Prevent glare by using a shield or lamp housing which conceals the bulb.  3. Direct lighting fixture onto the ground.  4. Lighting brightness should be 0.05 watts per square foot.  5. Using multiple lamps of moderate power instead of a few powerful lamps will reduce glare and provide more even illumination.  6. Security lighting fixtures should be easily accessible for bulb changing and cleaning.   7. Make sure the electric meter box is locked or difficult to get to.   8. Control and power lines, where outside or vulnerable, should be either buried well underground preferably in conduit or at a height of at least twenty-four [24'] feet.   9. Multiple circuits should be used to avoid an unintentional or malicious short or cut causing all security lights to stop working.   10. Security lighting fixtures should be installed properly.   11. Security lighting should not be installed where they can create blinding glare to oncoming drivers.   12. Benefits Of Security Lighting: Deter burglars, intruders and vandalism, Reduce Insurance Costs.   13. Increase safety for employees leaving work after dark.   14. HID lights are energy efficient which reduce overhead. Can integrate with existing alarm systems.

 

 

ANALYTICAL SITE STATISTICS   ·  EAGLE CANYON LODGE RUIDOSO  ·  NEW MEXICO  [ECL.RNM]

SITE DRAFT SUMMARY

Total Area of Planning Parcel as Client Ownership
   * [Acreage Conversion]

135,360.0
[135,360 ÷ 43,560]

Square Feet
[3.11 Acres]

100%

 

Non-Fee Areas of Total Planning Parcel
Area Identified as Wilson Dedicated Right of Way
For Public Walkway & Limited Use Drive
Conjoining Subject Fee Parcels
   * [Acreage Conversion]

4,806.0
[4,806.0 ÷ 43,560]

Square Feet
[0 .11 Acre]

04%

 

Non-Fee Areas of Total Planning Parcel
Area Identified as Flowage Rio Ruidoso
On-Site Northerly Route Active
On-Site Southerly Route Dam Re-Routed Upstream
   * [Acreage Conversion]

9,756.0
[9,756.0 ÷ 43,560]

Square Feet
[0.22 Acre]

07%

 

Total NET FEE Area of Improvements
Including Landscape Plantings
   * [Acreage Conversion]

120,798.0
[120,798.0 ÷ 43,560]

Square Feet
[2.77 Acres]

89%

 

 

 

 

 

 

SITE AREA OF POTENTIAL FLOOD INUNDATION  -  SOUTHERLY PARCEL

SITE DRAFT SUMMARY

Total Area Identified as Potential Flood Inundation
  * Acreage Conversion

52,560.0
[52,560.0 ÷ 43,560]

Square Feet
[1.21 Acres]

100%

 

[Non-Fee Areas of Total Planning Parcel]
Area Identified as Wilson Dedicated Right of Way
For Public Walkway & Limited Use Drive
Conjoining Subject Fee Parcels
  * [Acreage Conversion]

4,806.0
[4,806.0 ÷ 43,560]

Square Feet
[0 .11 Acre]

09%

 

[Non-Fee Areas of Total Planning Parcel]
Area Identified as Flowage Rio Ruidoso
On-Site Northerly Route Active
On-Site Southerly Route Dam Re-Routed Upstream
   * [Acreage Conversion]

9,756.0
[9,756.0 ÷ 43,560]

Square Feet
[0 .22 Acre]

19%

 

Total NET FEE Area of Potential Flood Inundation
   * [Acreage Conversion]

37,998.0
[37,998.0 ÷ 43,560]

Square Feet
[0.87 Acre]

72%

 

 

RIO RUIDOSO @ EAGLE CANYON LODGE
SITE SPECIFIC FLOOD INUNDATION DETERMINATION & TBNC PROPOSED MITIGATION

The National Flood Insurance Program [NFIP] is a program created by the Congress of the United States in 1968 through the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968 [P.L. 90-448]. The program enables property owners in participating communities to purchase insurance protection from the government against losses from flooding. This insurance is designed to provide an insurance alternative to disaster assistance to meet the escalating costs of repairing damage to buildings and their contents caused by floods. As of April 2010, the program insured about 5.5 million homes and selective commercial and public-use facilities, the majority of which were in Texas and Florida.

 

 

 

TBNC REMEDIATION IMPLIMENTATION METHODOLOGIES
COMPLIANCIES WITH FEMA / NFIP REVISED 1978 CERTIFICATIONS

Participation in the NFIP is based on an agreement between local communities and the federal government which states that if a community will adopt and enforce a floodplain management ordinance to reduce future flood risks to new construction in Special Flood Hazard Areas [SFHA], the federal government will make flood insurance available within the community as a financial protection against flood losses. The SFHAs and other risk premium zones applicable to each participating community are depicted on Flood Insurance Rate Maps [FIRMs]. The Mitigation Division within the Federal Emergency Management Agency manages the NFIP and oversees the floodplain management and mapping components of the Program.

The intent was to reduce future flood damage through community floodplain management ordinances and provide protection for property owners against potential losses through an insurance mechanism that requires a premium to be paid for the protection. The NFIP is meant to be self-supporting, though in 2004 Congress found that repetitive-loss properties cost the taxpayer about $200 million annually. Congress originally intended that operating expenses and flood insurance claims be paid for through the premiums collected for flood insurance policies. NFIP borrows from the U.S. Treasury for times when losses are heavy, and these loans are paid back with interest.

Since 1978, the National Flood Insurance Program has paid more than $38 billion in claims [as of March 31, 2011]. More than forty [40%] percent of that money has gone to residents of Louisiana

TBNC Edgemon Eagle Canyon Lodge NFIP / FEMA Flood Inundation Mitigation Program Edgemon @ Eagle Canyon Lodge Ruidoso, New Mexico USA Flood Works
Visit FEMA / NFIP Web Presence Off Site @  www.floodsmart.gov/floodsmart

 

 

SWMP PROGRAM EAGLE CANYON LODGE
Permeability and Pervious Surfaces Analysis

SITE DRAFT SUMMARY

Total NET FEE Area of Improvements
Including Landscape Plantings
    * [Acreage Conversion]

120,798.0
[120,798.0 ÷ 43,560]

Square Feet
[2.77 Acres]

100%

 

Structure Footprints

     

Main Lodge

7,598.0

Square Feet

 

Conference Centre [Retreat]

1,392.0

Square Feet

 

Six [6] Cottages 1,424 Sq. Ft. Each

8,544.0

Square Feet

 

Island Wedding Gazebo

324.0

Square Feet

 

Vignette Gazebo

314.0

Square Feet

 

Refuse Enclosure 10.0' x 16.0'

160.0

Square Feet

 
 

TOTAL STRUCTURE FOOTPRINT CALCULATION
* [Acreage Conversion]

18,332.0
[18,332.0 ÷ 43,560]

Square Feet
[0.42 Acre]

15%

 

Impervious Surfaces Calculations

     

Main Lodge AC Paved Parking and Driveway

11,690.0

Square Feet

 

Concrete Surfaces Including Walkways, Patios & Steps

6,320.0

Square Feet

 

Concrete Curbing, Retaining Walls Footprints &
Drainage Culvert Surfaces

1,484.0

Square Feet

 

Nail Wall x Faux Wall Retaining Surfaces

1,010.0

Square Feet

 

"Dry Effect" Waterfeature-Like Element @ Gazebo
Constructed as an Esthetic Element Retaining Wall

610.0

Square Feet

 

Concrete Bridge Surface Southerly 20.0' x 7.25'

145.0

Square Feet

 
 

TOTAL IMPERVIOUS SURFACES CALCULATIONS
* [Acreage Conversion]

21,259.0
[21,259.0 ÷ 43,560]

Square Feet
[0.49 Acre]

18%

 

Semipervious Surfaces Calculations

     

Interlocking Paving Stone Main Lodge Drive Area

4,671.0

Square Feet

 

Interlocking Paving Stone @ Conference Centre [Retreat]

940.0

Square Feet

 

Interlocking Paving Stone @ Island Wedding Gazebo

400.0

Square Feet

 

Interlocking Parking Islands @ Southerly Cottages
Including Approach Areas to Southerly Cottages

2,708.0

Square Feet

 

Wood Decking Bridge @ The Rio Ruidoso 24.0 x 7.5'

180.0

Square Feet

 

Boulder Revetment Area Conjoining the Rio Ruidoso
at The Main Lodge, Erosion Headwalls at Bridges
and as Energy Dissipation Standards at Drain Outlets

1,385.0

Square Feet

 

"Dry Effect" Rock Features at Southerly Parking

916.0

Square Feet

 

Granular Surfaces at The "Limited Use Roadway"
And Areas Utilized as Driveway and Parking at the
Southerly Cottages Area.

24,485.0

Square Feet

 

Granular Surfaces Utilized as Pathways and Walkways,
and Passive Areas at Cottage Stairs, Recreational Areas
and Passive Ground Covering.

11,880.0

Square Feet

 

 

TOTAL SEMIPERVIOUS SURFACES CALCULATIONS
* [Acreage Conversion]

47,565.0
[47,565.0 ÷ 43,560]

Square Feet
[1.09 Acre]

39%

 

Pervious Surfaces Calculations

     

Waterbodies, Reservoir and Retention Basins

0.00

Square Feet

 

Area Considered Landscaping Areas, with
Tree and Shrub Plantings Emitter Irrigation System

33,642.0

Square Feet

 
 

TOTAL PERVOIUS SURFACES CALCULATIONS
* [Acreage Conversion]

33,642.0
[33,642.0 ÷ 43,560]

Square Feet
[0.77 Acre]

28%

 

 

 

National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System
[NPDES]
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGANCY

TBNC Edgemon Eagle Canyon Lodge SWMP EPA Stormwater Management Program, Rio Ruidoso Pervious and SemiPervious Applications, Environmental Planning EC Ops Edgemon New Mexico USA

Visit the EPA Stormwater Management Web Presence Off Site
@
http://cfpub1.epa.gov/npdes/stormwater/menuofbmps/index.cfm

Stormwater Management Best Management Practices [BMPs] are control measures taken to mitigate changes to both quantity and quality of urban runoff caused through changes to land use. Generally BMPs focus on water quality problems caused by increased impervious surfaces from land development. BMPs are designed to reduce stormwater volume, peak flows, and/or nonpoint source pollution through evapotranspiration, infiltration, detention, and filtration or biological and chemical actions.

Stormwater BMPs can be classified as "structural" [i.e., devices installed or constructed on a site] or "non-structural" ;procedures, such as modified landscaping practices]. There are a variety of BMPs available, depending on pollutant removal capabilities. A list of BMPs can be found at the EPA National Menu of Stormwater BMPs.

Best Management Practices[BMP] is a term used in the United States and Canada to describe a type of water pollution control. Historically the term has referred to auxiliary pollution controls in the fields of industrial wastewater control and municipal sewage control, while in stormwater management [both urban and rural] and wetland management, BMPs may refer to a principal control or treatment technique as well.

Beginning in the twentieth century, designers of industrial and municipal sewage pollution controls typically utilized engineered systems [e.g. filters, clarifiers, biological reactors] to provide the central components of pollution control systems, and used the term "BMPs" to describe the supporting functions for these systems, such as operator training and equipment maintenance. Stormwater management, as a specialized area within the field of environmental engineering, emerged later in the 20th century, and practitioners have used the term BMP to describe both structural or engineered control devices and systems [e.g. retention ponds] to treat polluted stormwater, as well as operational or procedural practices [e.g. minimizing use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides].

Low-impact development [LID] is a term used in the United States to describe a land planning and engineering design approach to managing stormwater runoff. LID emphasizes conservation and use of on-site natural features to protect water quality. This approach implements engineered small-scale hydrologic controls to replicate the pre-development hydrologic regime of watersheds through infiltrating, filtering, storing, evaporating, and detaining runoff close to its source.

LID is similar to sustainable urban drainage systems [SUDS], a term used in the United Kingdom, water-sensitive urban design [WSUD], a term used in Australia, natural drainage systems a term used in Seattle, Washington and "Onsite Stormwater Management", a term used by the Washington State Department of Ecology.

 

 

 

 

REPRESENTATIONAL SUBSURFACE RETENTION AND/OR DETENTION OF STORM WATER RUNOFF
AND FOR PROTOTYPICAL QUALITY BMP APPLICATION

Visit Manufacturer's Off Site Web Presence
@
www.stormchambers.com

StormChamber™ storm water chambers are less expensive, quicker and easier to install than other types of underground storm water chamber systems.  The side-portal feed provides greater flexibility in engineering and hydraulic design, eliminating circuitous routing of feed pipes from inlet structures to entry point of a header pipe.

PRODUCT BENEFITS

StormChamber™ was designed as an open bottom, high-density polyethylene infiltration chamber BMP which functions in both permeable and non-permeable soils for subsurface retention or detention of storm water runoff and for a water quality BMP. It reduces nutrient and other pollutant loadings by taking advantage of the natural biological and physical properties of the soil, directly comparable to the functions of a septic drain field. It also recharges ground water drinking supplies, while concurrently helping to maintain base flow to streams, wetlands, lakes, and ponds, and counter salt-water intrusion.

The StormChamber™ storm water management system provides an environmentally progressive and technologically advanced storage and pollutant removal solution that is more cost-effective and requires less maintenance than other types of underground storm water management systems.

StormChamber™ was developed by biologists, ecologists, and engineers to improve upon older plastic storm water chambers that have been used in the marketplace for over 10 years. StormChamber™ utilizes the same basic corrugated arch shape for structural integrity and exceeds the AASHTO H20 wheel load rating by three times. StormChamber™ significantly exceeds the storage capacity of existing plastic chambers by over 40%, resulting in a need for fewer chambers, less stone, less filter fabric, less excavation, and approximately 50% less time to install. The side portal feeds eliminate the need for expensive header pipe systems currently used to manifold storm water effluent into rows of chamber systems.

The open bottom of the StormChamber™ provides maximum infiltrative surface area, unlike the holes of a perforated pipe that easily become clogged. The open infiltration surface area functions similar to a septic drain field for nitrogen, phosphorous and other pollutant degradation with formation of a bio-mat of micro-organisms upon the underlying stone and soil. The infiltration of storm water also helps to replicate pre-construction hydrology as it recharges groundwater supplies, maintaining base flow to streams and wetlands and in coastal areas, helping to retard salt water intrusion.

StormChamber™ systems are not limited to areas with pervious soils. In non-pervious areas underground storage can also be provided with regulated outflow. Under these conditions, water quality is still enhanced more than with a pond or an underground pipe system due to the remediating effect of the bio-mat. Elimination of a pond also leaves land available for other uses.

REPRESENTATIONAL SITE APPLICATION

REPRESENTATIONAL CERTIFIED TECHNICIANS

REPRESENTATIONAL HEADWALL APPLICATION

 

   
   

LEED CERTIFICATION LEVELS

LEED provides a complete framework for assessing building and development performance and meeting sustainability goals. Based on a system of prerequisites and credits, LEED projects earn points during the certification process and then are awarded one of the four certification levels: Certified, Silver, Gold, and Platinum.

StormChamber™ systems can help you obtain up to 18 points for LEED Certification in the New Construction [LEED-NC] Category by having post-development hydrology mimic pre-development hydrology and/or with runoff/gray water reuse. Potential points available:

Sustainable Sites - 5 points
Water Efficiency - 5 points
Materials and Resources - 4 points
Innovation and Design Process - 4 points

   

 

 

ENGINEERING SPECIFICATIONS FOR StormChamber™ SYSTEMS

Each chamber will be formed from high molecular weight/high density polyethylene. Each chamber will be composed of at least 40% recycled material.
The stone base that the chambers are placed on will not be compacted in order to avoid compaction of the stone-soil interface, which restricts soil infiltration.
The chamber system will be designed without filter fabric under the chambers in order to avoid restriction of soil infiltration, which occurs from the normal clogging of the filter fabric from sediment and debris deposition.

Use of filter fabric between the soil and stone backfill layer and lining the side walls of the excavated area will be required to prevent intrusion of soil or silt into the chambers and surrounding stone.

Each chamber will be capable of supporting a minimum of 24,000 pounds per square foot (i.e., three times the AASHTO H-20 Wheel Load Rating).

Each chamber will be capable of being installed with a minimum of 25 feet of cover above the crown of the chamber.

Each chamber system will be capable of being installed in at least two layers, providing a minimum of 0.8 cubic feet of storage per square foot of surface area.

Each chamber system will be capable of being installed with a minimum of six inches of stone base.

Each chamber will be 34.04" high, 60" wide and 102.5" long.  Lay-up length will be 8.1' (start and end unit) and 7.6' (middle unit).

Each chamber will have 14 ribs of approximately 3.6" in height, 3.8" wide at the top and tapering to 4.4" at the bottom. Spacing of the ribs at the bottom of the chamber will be approximately 4.9" and approximately 3.2" at the top. One smaller rib sized dimensionally to effectively nest under and interlock to connect units will be 2.9" high, 3.3" wide at the top of the rib, and 4.1" wide at the base.

Overall height to the inside rib will be 30.44".  Overall height to the outside rib will be 34.04".

Each chamber will have a defined top portal which is structurally enhanced to compensate for loss of structural integrity when apertures are cut open to receive pipe. Each such portal will be capable to receive up to a 12" PVC pipe.

Each chamber will have defined side portals on opposing sides which are structurally enhanced to compensate for loss of structural integrity when apertures are cut open to receive pipe.

Invert height for a 10" PVC pipe through a defined side portal will be 17.49".  Invert height for an 8" PVC pipe through a defined side portal will be 18.49".

Each chamber will be capable to accept an 8" or 10" PVC feed pipe through a defined side portal.  Each chamber will be capable to accept up to a 30" OD pipe through its end wall. Each chamber will be capable of storing at least 9 cubic feet per lineal foot with 6" or stone above and below the chamber. Each chamber system will be designed without utilizing a header pipe manifold system.  Stone diameter will be 3/4"-2".

 

 

 

TBNC Edgemon Eagle Canyon Lodge Recreational Communities and Resorts Site Engineering and Environmental Planning, Ruidoso, New Mexico SWMP & EPA Guidelines USA

PERMEABLE & SEMIPERVOIUS SURFACE APPLICATIONS

Permeable paving is a range of materials and techniques for paving roads, cycle-paths, parking lots and pavements that allow the movement of water and air around the paving material. Although some porous paving materials appear nearly indistinguishable from nonporous materials, their environmental effects are qualitatively different. Whether pervious concrete, porous asphalt, paving stones or bricks, all these pervious materials allow stormwater to percolate and infiltrate through areas that would traditionally be impervious to the soil below.

 

 

ESTIMATED AREA OF DISRUPTION STUDY  ·  PERCENTAGE OF SITE
EAGLE CANYON LODGE   ·    RUIDOSO  ·  NEW MEXICO  ·    USA

Total Area of Planning Parcel [Client Ownership]
    *  Acreage Conversion

135,360.0
[135,360 ÷ 43,560]

Square Feet
[3.11 Acres]

100.0%

 

Areas Considered Undisturbed

Area Identified as Wilson Dedicated Right of Way
For Public Walkway & Limited Use Drive
Conjoining Subject Fee Parcels
     * Acreage Conversion

4,806.0
[4,806.0 ÷ 43,560]

Square Feet
[0.11 Acre]

3.6%

Area Identified as Flowage Rio Ruidoso
On-Site Northerly Route Active
On-Site Southerly Route Dam Re-Routed Upstream
     *  Acreage Conversion

9,756.0
[9,756.0 ÷ 43,560]

Square Feet
[0 .22 Acre]

7.2%

Area Identified as Undisturbed Slope at Northerly
Ravine, Westerly Up-Sloping Terrain Beyond
Proposed Geosynthetic Modular Block Retaining Wall
     *  Acreage Conversion

3,905.0
[3,905.0 ÷ 43,560]

Square Feet
[0.09 Acre]

2.9%

Area Identified Immediately Westerly of Conference
Center at Area Considered an Island
     *  Acreage Conversion

2,250.0
[2,250.0 ÷ 43,560]

Square Feet
[0 .05 Acre]

1.7%

Area Identified as Southerly Parcel Slope,
Immediately Southerly of Romantic Cottages
     *  Acreage Conversion

5,805.0
[5,805.0 ÷ 43,560]

Square Feet
[0 .13 Acre]

4.3%

 

TOTAL SITE AREA CONSIDERED UNDISTURBED
* Acreage Conversion                                 

26,522.0
[26,522.0 ÷ 43,560]

Square Feet
[0 .61 Acres]

19.7%

 

 

 

 

Water Conservation Planning & Estimate Annual Water Requirements
LANDSCPAE PLANTINGS SCHEDULE

Area SP.A   Main Lodge & Conference Centre

TBNC Edgemon Recreational Resorts USA Eagle Canyon Lodge Ruidoso New Mexico Bloodgood Maple Image USA

18

24" Box

Specimen Trees

40

15-Gallon

Trees

6

5-Gallon

Trees

162

5-Gallon

Shrubs

507

1-Gallon

Shrubs

500

1-Gallon

Topical Color [Seasonal]

 

Area SP.B   Romantic Cottages & Parking Compound Southerly

TBNC Edgemon Recreational Resorts Eagle Canyon Lodge Rio Ruidoso, Quacking Aspen on the River, Resorts and Wellness Facilities, New Mexico, USA

8

24" Box

Specimen Trees

58

15-Gallon

Trees

14

5-Gallon

Trees

209

5-Gallon

Shrubs

265

1-Gallon

Shrubs

300

1-Gallon

Topical Color [Seasonal]

 

Area SP.C   Romantic Cottages Northerly In The "Holler"

TBNC Edgemon Recreational Resorts Eagle Canyon Lodge a Mountain Rtreat Resort on the Rio Ruidoso, New Mexico USA

6

24" Box

Specimen Trees

18

15-Gallon

Trees

18

5-Gallon

Trees

104

5-Gallon

Shrubs

197

1-Gallon

Shrubs

200

1-Gallon

Topical Color [Seasonal]

 

Estimated Annual Water Requirements : Landscape Planting Areas Schedule

85,835.16    Gallons Per Year [gpy]

Abstract : Basis of Assumption Reflects ;

Publication : "Landscape Irrigation Requirements in New Mexico"
Prepared by Brian C. Wilson, P.E., and Anthony Lucero, 1995

"Landscape irrigation water requirements in a normal weather year [1951-80], in gallons per square foot per year, for flood and sprinkler irrigation assuming an application efficiency of 50%, and a drip irrigation assuming an efficiency of 85%, in selected locations in new Mexico,,,"

"County Lincoln, Locale Ruidoso" [Page Two Excerpt]  Basis : Drip Irrigation TREE [Trees & Shrubs] = 3.42 Gallons per Square Foot

Summary : 25,098.0 Square Feet x 3.42 Gallons per Square Foot = 85,835.16 Gallons Per Year [gph]

 

 

 

 

RUIDOSO'S COMMUNITY FOREST MANAGEMENT PLAN

TBNC Edgemon Eagle Canyon Lodge & Recreational Resorts, Villas and Romantic Cottages Program, Ruidoso New Mexico USA Edgemon Design Build Ops 2011

Ranked the highest at-risk community in New Mexico to  wildfire hazards in 2000, Ruidoso is now considered a leader in the West with regard to community forest management planning and implementation.

From a local and human perspective, declining forest health puts Ruidoso’s community values at risk. These include public safety, economics, watershed values, recreational opportunities, wildlife habitat, healthy ecosystems, scenic vistas, historical and cultural sites, community peace-of-mind, and public support of local government.

 

BASAL AREA VALUATION EXHIBIT

Basal area is the term used in forest management that defines the area of a given section of land that is occupied by the cross-section of tree trunks and stems at their base.

In most countries, this is usually a measurement taken at a specimen's breast height [1.3m or 4.5ft] above the ground and includes the entire diameter of every tree, including the bark. Measurements are usually made for one [1] acre of land for comparison purposes to examine a forest's productivity and growth rate.

 

VILLAGE OF RUIDOSO [VoR] FORESTRY DEPARTMENT FIRE FUELS REDUCTION CONCEPT

It is widely accepted that removal of natural low intensity fire from southwest Ponderosa pine ecosystems has resulted in overcrowded forest stands. Consequences of this overcrowding include increased susceptibility to insect infestations and plant pathogens as well as increased risk to catastrophic wildfires.

To develop a community wide fuels reduction program, three key elements must be considered. First, planning the program must include stakeholders and incorporate the best science with available resources. Ruidoso collaborates on the “big picture” with eight other land management agencies by coordinating the Greater Ruidoso Area Wildland Urban Interface Working Group.

Third, engaging the general public must include as many portals to information sources as is available. This includes web sites, TV spots, printed material, workshops, lot assessments, etc. Public awareness and acceptance of the challenges are essential to a successful Community Forest Management Plan.

The current size of the Forestry Department, capacity of the forest debris pick-up service, and pool of forest contractors, indicate it will take until 2010 to complete the initial treatments on 13 thousand acres of private land. Concurrent with the initial treatment will be required bi-yearly pine needle raking to maintain defensible space compliance.

TBNC Edgemon Recreational Resorts Basal Calculations TAKE @ Eagle Canyon Lodge, Ruidoso, New Mexico, USA Edgemon Site Planning

 

TBNC Edgemon Recreational Resorts and Mountain Lodges Program Eagle Canyon Lodge, Ruidoso, New Mexico Fire Wise Forestry Managament & Environmental Planning Edgemon USA 2011

FIREWISE COMMUNITIES / USA RECOGNITION PROGRAM

Visit Firewise Communities USA @ Off Site Web Presence
www.firewise.org

By working with neighbors, individual residents can make their own property – and their neighborhood – much safer from the flames and embers of a wildfire. The Firewise Communities/USA® Recognition Program provides a series of steps so you and your neighbors can act now to keep homes and neighborhoods safer from fire.

 

PUBLIC LANDS CONSIDERATIONS

In response to the devastating 2000 fire season, the US Congress required a National Fire Plan [NFP] be developed. The NFP funds and implements program activities in five key areas. The five areas are: firefighting preparedness and facilities; rehabilitation and restoration of wildfire effected areas; hazardous fuel treatments; forest health projects; and community assistance.

In November of 2000, the Greater Ruidoso Area Wildland Urban Interface Working Group [GRAWUIWG] was created. The group meets monthly and is hosted by the Village at the Ruidoso Convention Center. Land holding members include the Lincoln National Forest, NM State Forestry, Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Mescalero Apache Tribe, Lincoln County, City of Ruidoso Downs, NM State Land Office, and the Village of Ruidoso.

Please visit the Forestry Partner Web sites off site web page.

 


 

EAGLE CANYON LODGE TREE & SHRUB PALETTE
DROUGHT & WATER CONSERVING FOCUS

Foundation Tree Installation

Symbol Key

Container Size

        Botanical Identification Name

      Common Use Name

24B.Ac.P.Blood

24" Box

Acer palmatum "Bloodgood" Brilliant

Burgundy Japanese Maple

24B.Ac.Rub

24" Box

Acer rubrum Red Scarlet Maple

Red Scarlet Maple

24B.Cer.Can

24" Box

Cercis canadensis "Forest Pansy"

Forest Pansy Red Bud

15G.Cer.Can

15-Gallon

Cercis canadensis "Forest Pansy"

Forest Pansy Red Bud

15G.Pin.Cem

15-Gallon

Pinus cembroides edulis Pinyon Pine

Two Needle Pinyon Pine

15G.Pin.Flex

15-Gallon

Pinus flexilis

Limber Pine

15G.Pin.Mug

15-Gallon

Pinus mugo mugo

Mugho Pine

15G.Pin.Syl

15-Gallon

Pinus sylvestris

Scotch Pine

15G.Pop.Alb

15-Gallon

Populus alba

White Poplar

15G.Pop.Nig

15-Gallon

Populus nigra "Italica"

Lombardy Poplar

24B.Pop.Tre

24" Box

Populus tremuloides

Quaking Aspen

15G.Pop.Tre

15-Gallon

Populus tremuloides

Quaking Aspen

 

Median Overstory Tree Installation

Symbol Key

Container Size

        Botanical Identification Name

      Common Use Name

15G.Chi.Lin

15-Gallon

Chilopsis linearis

Desert Willow

5G.Chi.Lin

5-Gallon

Chilopsis linearis

Desert Willow

5G.For.Neo

5-Gallon

Forestiera neomexicana

New Mexico Privet

24B.Gin.Bil

24" Box

Gingko biloba

Maidenhair Tree

15G.Gin.Bil

15-Gallon

Gingko biloba

Maidenhair Tree

15G.Lag.Fra.Com

15-Gallon

Lagerstroemia fauriei hybrids "Com"

Japanese Crape Myrtle "Comanche"

15G.Lag.Fra.Musk

15-Gallon

Lagerstroemia fauriei hybrids "Musk"

Japanese Crape Myrtle "Muskogee"

15G.Lag.Fra.Natz

15-Gallon

Lagerstroemia fauriei hybrids "Natz"

Japanese Crape Myrtle "Natchez"

15G.Mag.Sol

15-Gallon

Magnolia soulangiana "Burgundy"

Burgundy Saucer Magnolia

15G.Mag.Stel

15-Gallon

Magnolia stellata "Rubra"

Star Magnolia

 

Screening Ornamental Shrubberies Installation

Symbol Key

Container Size

        Botanical Identification Name

      Common Use Name

5G.Arc.Uva

5-Gallon

Arctostaphylos uva ursi Kinnikinnick

Kinnikinnick Indian Tobacco

5G.Rob.Neo

5-Gallon

Robinia neomexicana

New Mexico Locust

5G.Shep.Arg

5-Gallon

Shepherdia argentea

Silver Buffaloberry

 

Foundation Shrub Installation

Symbol Key

Container Size

        Botanical Identification Name

      Common Use Name

1G.Art.Cam

1-Gallon

Artemisia camensis cana

Silver sage

1G.Art.Fil

1-Gallon

Artemisia filifolia

Sand Sage

1G.Art.Tri

1-Gallon

Artemisia tridentata nova

Black Big Sage

1G.Cal.Vul

1-Gallon

Calluna vulgaris

Scotch Heather

5G.Cot.Hor

5-Gallon

Cotoneaster horizontalis

Rock Rose Cotoneaster

1G.Cot.Hor

1-Gallon

Cotoneaster horizontalis

Rock Rose Cotoneaster

5G.Cot.Mic

5-Gallon

Cotoneaster microphyllus

Rockspray Cotoneaster

5G.Ele.Com.Pun

5-Gallon

Elaeagnus commutata pungens

Silverberry

1G.Hyd.Arb

1-Gallon

Hydrangea arborescens

Smooth Hydrangea

1G.Fall.Par

1-Gallon

Fallugia paradoxa

Apache Plume

5G.Mah.Fre

5-Gallon

Mahonia fremontia "Golden"

Golden Abundance Mahonia

1G.Mah.Rep

1-Gallon

Mahonia repens

Creeping Mahonia

1G.Muhl.Pun

1-Gallon

Muhlenbergia pungens

Sandhill Muhley

1G.Pot.Fruit

1-Gallon

Potentilla fruiticosa

Cinquefoil

1G.Pur.Tri

1-Gallon

Purshia tridentata

Antelope Bitterbrush

1G.Ros.Off

1-Gallon

Rosmarinus officinalis

Rosemary

5G.Rhu.Tri

5-Gallon

Rhus trilobata

Three-Leaf Sumac

 

Vines Installation

Symbol Key

Container Size

        Botanical Identification Name

      Common Use Name

5G.Cle.Lin

5-Gallon

Clematis lingusticifolia

Western Virgin's Bower

5G.Lon.Hec

5-Gallon

Lonicera heckrotti

Gold Flame Honeysuckle

5G.Lon.Jap

5-Gallon

Lonicera japonica halliana

Hall's Honeysuckle

1G.Lon.Jap

1-Gallon

Lonicera japonica halliana

Hall's Honeysuckle

1G.Part.Ins

1-Gallon

Parthenocissus inserta

Woodbine

5G.Poly.Aub

5-Gallon

Polygonum aubertii

Silverlace Vine


 

 
 

 

RUIDOSO'S COMMUNITY FOREST MANAGEMENT PLAN
GENERAL CONDITIONS

• 

Slash must not be piled under power lines. If it is, contractor will not pass final inspection and will have to re-pile it.

 

Slash should be piled and not scattered along roadside. One or two large piles are better than a "wind-row". Avoid bar ditch as to not clog up  drainage

   

If the contractor is going to remove the slash for the property owner, you must have copy of water bill for the property that was thinned for credit at Sierra Contracting Inc

Forestry will ticket and prosecute illegal dumping ($500.00 to $1,000.00 fine).

Cost Share – Property owners responsible for CLEARLY marking property corners.

Cost Share – Contractors may NEVER change the mark even if property owner requests change. Always check with VoR Forester.

Slash removal requirements for MINIMUM ORDINANCE and COST SHARE PROGRAM have changed for steep slopes. VoR Forester must verify slope and flag areas for steep slope specifications.

0% to 40% slope…....no change – full removal required, green firewood must be covered with 6mil. clear plastic. All defensible space specs for Cost Share require full removal.

41% to 55% slope…..slash less than 3" in diameter may be piled in tight piles no more than four feet high unless approved by VoR Forester. Material larger than 3" in diameter must be piled and covered with 6 mil. clear plastic. Contour felling of boles allowed if approved by VoR Forester. Stumps to hold contour felled trees must not exceed 2'-0" from ground on uphill side and be trimmed back to contour height for final inspection approval.

56% or greater slope….contour felling must be done. Lop and scatter slash less than 3" in diameter. Stumps to hold contour felled trees must not exceed 2'-0" from ground on uphill side and be trimmed back to contour height for final inspection approval. No slash to stick up taller than 2'-0".

Cost share and minimum ordinance "leave" trees always marked in BLUE paint or flagging.

Minimum ordinance "cut" trees always marked in YELLOW paint or flagging.

Village contracted right of way hazard trees will be marked as a number with RED paint.

Property owner contracted neighbor to neighbor hazard trees will be marked with an "H" with RED paint.

 

To maintain status on the VoR courtesy forest contractors list the contractor MUST:

1

Maintain a VoR business license in good standing.

2

Zero legitimate complaints from property owners or VoR Forestry.

Here is how that works. If Forestry receives a complaint against a contractor, Forestry Director will call the contractor in and get the other side of the story (if there is one). Forestry Director will decide if it is a legitimate complaint and decide:

1

If not legitimate, forget it and advise the property owner.

2

If legitimate, will suspend the contractor from the list for six months and advise the contractor in writing and advise the property owner.

3

If questionable, will issue a written warning to the contractor which will stay in effect for six months and advise the property owner. If another legitimate or questionable complaint is received within that time period, contractor will be suspended for six months and advised in writing

 

 
 
 

THE GOOD NEIGHBORS [Long Term Area Residents]

TBNC Edgemon Recreational Resorts Eagle Canyon Lodge & Inn of The Mountain Gods Our Mescalero Neighbors & Friends Resort Up River, USA New Mexico, Edgemon

CULTURAL HISTORY

TBNC Edgemon Eagle Canyon Lodge Recreational Communities Ruidosos, New Mexico, My Friends the Mescaleros, Native Americans Tribal History USA

Today The Mescalero Tribe live on a reservation of 463,000 acres of what once was the heartland of
the native people's aboriginal homeland.

Hundreds of years ago, long before white men came to this land, these mountains, plains and deserts belonged to the Mescalero Apaches.

No other Native Americans in the Southwest caused the terror and constant fear in the settlers as the Apaches did throughout their existence. They raided Spanish, Mexican and American settlers, and were known to be expert guerrilla fighters who defended their homelands.

The Mescalero were essentially nomadic hunters and warriors, dwelling at one place for a temporary time in brush shelter known as a "Wicki up"; short rounded dwellings made of twigs or teepees made of elk hides and buffalo hides.

The Mescalero roamed freely throughout the Southwest including Texas, Arizona, Chihuahua, México and Sonora, México. Today, three sub-tribes, Mescalero, Lipan and Chiricahua, make up the Mescalero Apache Tribe.

THE MESCALERO AS GOOD NEIGHBORS

 

TBNC Edgemon Eagle Canyon Lodge Ruidoso, New Mexico, Geranimo Our Mescalero Warrior Neighbor, Environmnetal Planning & Site Engineering USA Edgemon

Apache is the collective term for several culturally related groups of Native Americans originally from the Southwest United States. The current division of Apachean groups includes the Navajo, Western Apache, Chiricahua, Mescalero, Jicarilla, Lipan, and Plains Apache [formerly Kiowa-Apache].

Geronimo was born into the Bedonkohe and married into the Chiricahua.

Goyahkla was born to the Bedonkohe band of the Apache, near Turkey Creek, a tributary of the Gila River in the modern-day state of New Mexico, then part of Mexico, but which his family considered Bedonkohe land. His grandfather [Mako] had been chief of the Bedonkohe Apache. He had three brothers and four sisters.

Goyahkla's parents raised him according to Apache traditions; after the death of his father, his mother took him to live with the Chihenne and he grew up with them. He married a woman named Alope from the Nedni-Chiricahua band of Apache when he was seventeen; they had three children. On March 6, 1858, a company of 400 Mexican soldiers from Sonora led by Colonel José María Carrasco attacked Goyahkla's camp outside Janos while the men were in town trading. Among those killed were Goyahkla's wife, his children, and his mother.

Geronimo's chief, Mangas Coloradas, sent him to Cochise's band for help in revenge against the Mexicans. Allegedly it was during this incident that the name Geronimo came about. This appellation stemmed from a battle in which, ignoring a deadly hail of bullets, he repeatedly attacked Mexican soldiers with a knife, causing them to utter appeals to Saint Jerome ["Jeronimo!"]. Americans heard this and thought his name was Geronimo, and the name stuck.

Geronimo married Chee-hash-kish and had two children, Chappo and Dohn-say. Then he took another wife, Nana-tha-thtith, with whom he had one child. He later had a wife named Zi-yeh at the same time as another wife, She-gha, one named Shtsha-she and later a wife named Ih-tedda. Geronimo's last wife was Azul.

Geronimo was raised with the traditional religious views of the Bedonkohe. When questioned about his views on life after death, he wrote in his 1905 autobiography, "As to the future state, the teachings of our tribe were not specific, that is, we had no definite idea of our relations and surroundings in after life. We believed that there is a life after this one, but no one ever told me as to what part of man lived after death ... We held that the discharge of one's duty would make his future life more pleasant, but whether that future life was worse than this life or better, we did not know, and no one was able to tell us. We hoped that in the future life, family and tribal relations would be resumed. In a way we believed this, but we did not know it."

 

TBNC Edgemon Recreational Communities Eagle Canyon Lodge Our Neighbors & Friends the Mescalero Native Americans Brief Logo, Edgemon Ruidosos, New Mexico USA

GERONIMO AS CHRISTIAN

Also in his later years, Geronimo embraced Christianity, and stated, "Since my life as a prisoner has begun I have heard the teachings of the white man's religion, and in many respects believe it to be better than the religion of my fathers ... Believing that in a wise way it is good to go to church, and that associating with Christians would improve my character, I have adopted the Christian religion. I believe that the church has helped me much during the short time I have been a member. I am not ashamed to be a Christian, and I am glad to know that the President of the United States is a Christian, for without the help of the Almighty I do not think he could rightly judge in ruling so many people. I have advised all of my people who are not Christians, to study that religion, because it seems to me the best religion in enabling one to live right." He joined the Dutch Reformed Church in 1903 but four years later was expelled for gambling. To the end of his life, he seemed to harbor ambivalent religious feelings, telling the Christian missionaries at a summer camp meeting in 1908 that he wanted to start over, while at the same time telling his tribesmen that he held to the old Apache religion.

 

 

 

TODAY'S MESCALERO RESORT ENTERPRISES

TBNC Edgemon Recreational Resorts Eagle Canyon Lodge Ruidosos, New Mexico Our Good Neighbors the Mescalero Tribe, Site Engineering & Planning  USA 

innofthemountaingods.com

TBNC Edgemon Recreational Resorts, Eagle Canyon Lodge & Inn of the Mountain Gods, My Mescalero Friends Resort and Gamng Establishment, USA

innofthemountaingods.com

ABOUT THE INN OF THE MOUNTAIN GODS

Experience a resort and casino that is above and beyond.

New Mexico’s premier mountain resort awaits with impeccable AAA Four-Diamond service, mouth watering cuisine for every palate, incredible gaming action, and breathtaking alpine scenery to nurture your soul.

Situated high in the picturesque mountains of Mescalero, New Mexico just outside of Ruidoso, guests return time and time again to Inn of the Mountain Gods to enjoy the clean mountain air, stunning panoramic views, and exciting entertainment options.

Upon your arrival, you’ll be greeted by a stunning lobby featuring a sweeping view of the snowcapped mountains, lake and championship golf course.

Guests have come to expect all of the little extras that come standard here at Inn of the Mountain Gods. From the moment you arrive, you’ll be enchanted by original works of art throughout the property, roaring fireplaces in the lobby, and a tranquil setting that makes the everyday world feel a million miles away. Beyond that, discover an endless variety of activities, entertainment and escapes to make it a getaway you’ll never forget.

 

TBNC Edgemon Recreational Resorts Eagle Canyon Lodge Ruidosos, New Mexico Our Neighbors the Mescaleros and Their Wonderful Inn of the Mountain Gods Resort, USA 

BRIEF RESORT AMENITIES LISTING

 

273 Luxury Rooms and Suites

Numerous Dining & Banquet Options

40,000 sq. ft. Conference / Meeting Space

38,000 sq. ft. Casino & Gaming

Indoor Swimming Pool & Spas

Fully Equipped Workout Facility

18-hole Championship Golf Course

Big Game Hunting

Skeet Shooting

Skiing and Snowboarding

Horseback Riding

Fishing

Gondola rides

 

The Mescalero Apache Tribe owns and operates both the Inn of the Mountain Gods Resort and Casino and Ski Apache Ski Resort,
as well other Reservation-based enterprises.

innofthemountaingods.com

TBNC Edgemon Recreational Resorts eagle Canyon Lodge & Inn of the Mountain Gods, Ruidoso, New Mexico Gaming & Recreational Resorts, USA

 

Ski Apache opened under the name “Sierra Blanca Ski Resort” during Christmas of 1961. Amazingly, twenty-six hundred people an hour were fast carried up the ski run crest via three T-bar lifts. In 1962, the very first mono-cable four-passenger gondola in North America was built to accommodate a greater number of skiers. And it seems just in time as twenty-five thousand skiers showed up for the second season.

Since 1963, the resort has been owned and operated by the Mescalero Apache Tribe. Only two years after its official opening in 1961, Robert O. Anderson, the wealthy oil man who built and opened the slopes, sold the resort to the able hands of the Mescalero Apaches. It wasn’t until the 1984-85 season that the slopes were appropriately named “Ski Apache”.

The wood-spired Main Lodge was designed by Victor Lundy … proclaimed as America’s Outstanding Architect in 1958. Since the opening season of 1961, this lodge has stood statuesque, an unfailing sentry below the crest. With wood spires reflective of the surrounding pines, the Lodge mirrors the natural beauty of the Sacramento Mountains. Lundy succeeded in introducing Modernism architecture with a practical eye towards the skiers needs.

 

 

TBNC Edgemon Eagle Canyon Lodge Ruidoso, New Mexico, USA, Village of Ruidoso Summer Iconic Logo Exhibit

 

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