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WATERFEATURE DESIGN, PLANNING, ENGINEERING & CONSTRUCTION PROGRAMS
CALIFORNIA & MEXICO

 

Representational Built Study Exhibits

 

TBNC L+Waterworks TDG.SD edificio hunter La Gloria Baja California Initial Draft Elevation & Section Study

Industrias Hunter, S. de R. L. de C.V.
Calle Nodika # 8615, Fracc. La Jolla
Parque Industrial Nordika, Tijuana BC  22709

 

 

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edificio Hunter Baja California Waterfeature Protypical Development Built Exhibit Edgemon Mexico
Manufactured Cementitious Artisan Stone Waterfeature
Industrias Hunter, S. de R. L. de C.V.
Parque Industrial Nordika, Tijuana BC  22709


STUDY CREDIT

In landscape architecture, a waterfeature is one [1] or more components from a range of fountains, pools, ponds, cascades, waterfalls, and streams.

Before the eighteenth [18th century] they were usually powered by gravity, though the famous Hanging Gardens of Babylon are described by Strabo as supplied by an Archimedean screw.

Other examples were supplied with water using hydraulic rams. Since the Eighteenth [18th] century, the majority of water features have been powered by pumps. In the past, the power source was sometimes a steam engine, but in modern features it is almost always powered by electricity.

 

The advantages of using solar power include environmental benefits, no electrical lines in the built environment, and free energy.

Modern water features are typically self-contained, meaning that they do not require water to be plumbed in; rather water is recycled from either a pond or a hidden reservoir, also known as a sump. The sump can either be contained within the water feature, or buried underground [in the case of an outdoor water feature].

A water feature may be indoor or outdoor and can be any size, from a desk top water fountain to a large indoor waterfall that covers an entire wall in a large commercial building, and can be made from any number of materials, including stone, granite, stainless steel, resin, iron,and glass.

Most water features are electronically controlled, ranging from simple timer actuators to sophisticated computerized controls for synchronizing music to water and light animation.

Water features often offer additional benefits to property owners, such as increased curb appeal, facility's value, reduced noise pollution [due to the sound of water overpowering outside noise], and improved air quality.

In early modern Europe, fountains were found in the elaborate gardens of the mansions of the wealthy, and in modern times can be an element in urban design provided by the municipal authorities or public subscription. A notable modern example is the Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fountain in London, England.

 

 

TBNC L+Waterworks edificio hunter La Gloria Baja California Study Exhibits Site Overview

Industrias Hunter, S. de R. L. de C.V.

Calle Nodika # 8615 Fracc. · La Jolla · Parque Industrial Nordika · Tijuana BC  22709

 

 

Client's Representational Brief Submittal Exhibit
Single Image Representational Desired Scope & Scale

Architectural Brief

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks Edgemon Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers, Water Feature Remediation Study La Jolla, California Image Origination & Graphic Credit
The Plaza at La Jolla Village

An Architectural Brief is a statement of a Client's requirements, which form the basis for appointing an Architect. The Brief describes the requirements that need to be reconciled and accommodated, and is developed first as a design which is submitted for approval, and subsequently constructed as a building or other structure.

A Brief is a written document that might be anything from a single page to a multiple volume set of documents. The term program is often used today, in conjunction with, and in part as a synonym of, an "Architectural Brief". "Program" is used more often in the United States whereas "Brief" is used more outside the United States, internationally. An architect's design is considered the response to the building program.


 

 

 

 

 

PRODUCTION PLAN SET - AS BUILT REGISTRY

TBNC Land + Waterworks Exhibits edificio hunter Baja California Significant Waterfeature TBNC L+W Exhibits Waterworks edificio hunter Baja california Production Plan Set Exhibits Sheet 002

L+W.MEX.IH.BC.WF.13.T.0061.001
TBNC CD.TDG.Baja.Ops.CM.27.A

MASTER SITE PLAN

L+W.MEX.IH.BC.WF.13.T.0061.002
TBNC CD.TDG.Baja.Ops.CM.27.B

ELEVATION
GRADIENTS

   
TBNC L+Waterworks Waterfeature Exhibits edificio hunter Baja California Built Product Plan Set Exhibit Sheet 03 TBNC Land + Waterworks Waterfeature Exhibits edificio hunter Baja California Built Product & Delivery Plan Set Sheet 004

L+W.MEX.IH.BC.WF.13.T.0061.003
TBNC CD.TDG.Baja.Ops.CM.27.C

HYDRAULICS
ENGINEERING

L+W.MEX.IH.BC.WF.13.T.0061.004
TBNC CD.TDG.Baja.Ops.CM.27.D

ELECTRICAL
ENGINEERING PLAN

   
TBNC L+Waterworks Waterfeature Exhibits edificio hunter Baja California Built Product Presentation Plan Set Sheet 005 TBNC Land + Waterworks Production Built Exhibits edificio hunter Baja California Plan Set Sheet 006 Presentation TBNC

L+W.MEX.IH.BC.WF.13.T.0061.005
TBNC CD.TDG.Baja.Ops.CM.27.E

CEMENTITIOUS
APPLICATIONS

L+W.MEX.IH.BC.WF.13.T.0061.006
TBNC CD.TDG.Baja.Ops.CM.27.F

EQUIPMENT VAULT
STRUCTURAL SITE

   
TBNC Land + Waterworks Waterfeature Exhibits edificio hunter Baja California La Gloria Plan Set Sheet 07 of Approved Series TBNC TBNC Land + Waterworks Representational Waterfeature Development Exhibits edifcio hunter La Gloria Baja California Waterfeatures TBNC

L+W.MEX.IH.BC.WF.13.T.0061.007
TBNC CD.TDG.Baja.Ops.CM.27.G

EQUIPMENT VAULT
SECTION

L+W.MEX.IH.BC.WF.13.T.0061.008
TBNC CD.TDG.Baja.Ops.CM.27.H

EQUIPMENT VAULT
STRUCTURAL

   
TBNC Land + Waterworks Representational Waterfetures Design & Construct Exhibits edificio hunter Baja California Plan Set Sheet 009 TBNC L + Waterworks Representational Waterfeature Built Exhibits edificio hunter La Gloria Baja California Plan set Sheet 10 Dekivered Product

L+W.MEX.IH.BC.WF.13.T.0061.009
TBNC CD.TDG.Baja.Ops.CM.27.I

AUXILARY RETURN
ENGINEERING

L+Ww.MEX.IH.BC.WF.13.T.0061.010
TBNC CD.TDG.Baja.Ops.CM.27.J

DETAILS
SPECIFICATIONS

 

    

      

LINEAR PARKLANDS WATERFEATURE PRE-CONSTRUCTION IMAGE RECORDINGS

TBNC Land+Waterworks edificio Hunter La Gloria Baja California Waterfeture TDG.SD Initial Site Reconn File Photography

View to Edifice Main Entry Mezzanine
TBNC Land+Waterworks edificio Hunter Baja California TDG. Initial Study Mezzanine View Mexico TBNC

TBNC Land+Waterworks edificio Hunter Baja California Initial TDG.SD Site Report. La Gloria, Mexico TBNC Edgemon

VIEW NORTHERLY TO VAULT SITE

VIEW WESTERLY TO EDIFICE MAIN ENTRY

VIEW SOUTHERLY TO MAIN GATE

TBNC.PreCon.BC
WF.008

TDG.SD
Image


TBNC.PreCon.BC
WF.011

TDG.SD
Image

TBNC.PreCon.BC
WF.018

TDG.SD
Image

     

   


 

COURSE OF CONSTRUCTION IMAGE RECORDINGS

Pre-Feature Site View Northerly

Equipment Vault Fabrication

Equipment Vault Site Placement

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edificio Hunter BC Production Series Exhibits Baja California
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edificio Hunter Waterfeature Production File Recordings Baja California Edgemon
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edificio Hunter Waterfeature Baja California Progressive Construction Recordings & Exhibits Edgemon

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.0018

Figure BC.001

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.0036

Figure BC.002

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.0068

Figure BC.003

     

Hydraulic Systems Fabrication

Lateral Supply & Return Lines

Representational Journeyman Pipefitter

TBNC Edgemon Land + Wterworks edifico Hunter Waterfeature Production Recordings Baja California Edgemon
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edificio Hunter Waterfeature Baja California Production Progressive File Photographic Recordings Edgemon
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edificio Hunter Waterfeature Baja California Production Recording Series & Exhibits

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.0078

Figure BC.004

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.0103

Figure BC.005

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.0118

Figure BC.006

     

Vertical Steel Fabrication

Reinforcement Steel Fabrication

Cementitious Surface Application

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edificio Hunter Baja California Waterfeature Development Design, Engineer & Construct Progressive File Recordings Edgemon
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edificio Hunter Baja California Waterfeature Design, Engineer & Construct, Proressive File Recordings Edgemon
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edificio Hunter Baja California Waterfeature Design, Engineer and Construct Progressive Construction File Recordings Edgemon

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.0211

Figure BC.007

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.0238

Figure BC.008

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.0258

Figure BC.009

     

Feature Shotcrete Application

Feature Falls Shotcrete Application

Feature Primary Structural Formation

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edificio Hunter Baja California Waterfeature Design Engineer and Construct File Progress Recordings Edgemon
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edifico Hunter Baja California Waterfeature Design, Engineer and Construct, Progressive Construction Recordings Edgemon
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edificio Hunter Baja California Waterfeature Design, Engineer and Construct Progressive Construction File Recordings Edgemon

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.0302

Figure BC.010

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.0333

Figure BC.011

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.0489

Figure BC.012

     

Prototypical Mechanical Application

Continuous Shotcrete Application

Prototypical Full Day Application

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edificio Hunter Baja California Waterfeature Design, Engineer and Construct Progressive Construction File Recordings Edgemon
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edifcio Hunter Baja California Waterfeature Design, Engineer and Construct Progressive File Recordings Edgemon
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edifcio Hunter Baja California Waterfeature Design, Engineer and Construct Progressive Construction File Recordings Edgemon

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.0501

Figure BC.013

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.0521

Figure BC.014

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.0580

Figure BC.015

     

MFG. Cementitious Rock Formation

Streambed View Southerly

Artisan @ Creativity - MFG Boulders

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edificio Hunter Baja California Waterfeature Design, Engineer and Construct Progressive Construction File Recordings Edgemon
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edifcio Hunter Baja California Waterfeature Design, Engineer and Construct, Progressive Construction File Recordings Edgemon
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edifcio Hunter Baja California Waterfeature Design, Engineer and Construct, Progressive Construction File Recordings Edgemon

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.0611

Figure BC.016

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.0618

Figure BC.017

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.0664

Figure BC.018

   

 

Prototypical Colorization Application

Prototypical Continuing Colorization

Aggregate Surface Application

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edifcio Hunter Baja California Waterfeature Design, Engineer and Construct Progressive Construction File Recordings Edgemon
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edifcio Hunter Baja California Waterfeature Design, Engineer and Construct Progressive File Photography Records Edgemon
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edifcio Hunter Baja California Waterfeature Design, Engineer and Construct Progressive Construction Recordings Edgemon

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.0868

Figure BC.019

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.0955

Figure BC.020

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.1005

Figure BC.021

     

Aggregate Surface Detail & Finish

Feature Detailing

Cobble Enhancement Application

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edificio Hunter Baja California Waterfeature Design, Engineer and Construct Progressive Construction File Recordings Edgemon
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edificio Hunter Baja California Waterfetaure Design, Engineer and Construct, Progressive Construction File Recordings Edgemon
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edificio Hunter Baja California Waterfeature Design, Engineer and Construct Progressive Construction Recording Exhibits Edgemon

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.1021

Figure BC.022

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.1031

Figure BC.023

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.1088

Figure BC.024

     

Initial Operational Testing

Feature in Operation

View Northerly to Completed Feature

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edifico Hunter Baja California Design, Engineer and Construct, Progressive Construction File Recordings Edgemon
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edifcio Hunter Baja California Waterfeature Design, Engineer and Construct Progressive Construction File Recordings Edgemon
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks edifico Hunter Baja California Design, Engineering & Construction, Progressive File Recordings and Site Exhibits Edgemon

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.1235

Figure BC.025

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.1244

Figure BC.026

TBNC.BCWF.CoC.IR.1265

Figure BC.027

     
     

 

SITE DEVELOPMENT PRIME CONTRACT LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT

 

Teshima Design Group was established in 1988 by Ronald S. Teshima, RLA, ASLA, and is based in San Diego, California, to provide professional quality landscape architectural design and planning to enhance the built environment. 

Teshima Design Group's business commitment is precise: to provide its clients the finest in creative landscape architectural designs within the prescribed scope and budget of each project.

A select support staff has been assembled to ensure the highest caliber services and prompt, efficient response to client needs and desires.


Visit Teshima Design Group Off-Site Web Presence
@
www.teshimadesign.com

CONTACT

9903 Businesspark Avenue · Suite 100 · San Diego · California 92131
858.693.8824 Corporate Contact · 858.693.1182 Facsimile

 



 

 

SHOTCRETE APPLICATION
Pneumatically Applied Concrete

 


STUDY CREDIT

Shotcrete is concrete [or sometimes mortar] conveyed through a hose and pneumatically projected at high velocity onto a surface, as a construction technique. It is reinforced by conventional steel rods, steel mesh, and/or fibers. Fiber reinforcement [steel or synthetic] is also used for stabilization in applications such as slopes or tunneling

Shotcrete is usually an all-inclusive term for both the wet-mix and dry-mix versions. In pool construction, however, the term "shotcrete" refers to wet-mix and "gunite" to dry-mix. In this context, these terms are not interchangeable [see "Shotcrete vs. gunite" discussion below].

Shotcrete is placed and compacted at the same time, due to the force with which it leaves the nozzle. It can be sprayed onto any type or shape of surface, including vertical or overhead areas.

CORPORATE CONTACT
www.walker-equipment.com

3009 South Jackson Avenue
South Chicago Heights · Illinois 60411
708.754.7070 Corporate · 708.754.8923 Facsimile

 

Brief Shotcrete History

Shotcrete, then known as gunite [/ˈgənīt/], was invented in 1907 by American taxidermist Carl Akeley to repair the crumbling facade of the Field Columbian Museum in Chicago [the old Palace of Fine Arts from the World's Columbian Exposition].Mr. Akeley used the method of blowing dry material out of a hose with compressed air, injecting water at the nozzle as it was released. In 1911, he was granted a patent for his inventions, the "cement gun", the equipment used, and "gunite", the material that was produced. There is no evidence that Akeley ever used sprayable concrete in his taxidermy work, as is sometimes suggested. F. Trubee Davison covered this and other Akeley inventions in a special issue of Natural History magazine.

Until the 1950s when the wet-mix process was devised, only the dry-mix process was used. In the 1960s, the alternative method for gunning by the dry method was devised with the development of the rotary gun, with an open hopper that could be fed continuously. Shotcrete is also a viable means and method for placing structural concrete.

The nozzleman is the person controlling the nozzle that delivers the concrete to the surface. The nozzle is controlled by hand on small jobs, for example the construction of small swimming pools. On larger work the nozzle can sometimes be held by mechanical arms where the nozzleman controls the operation by a hand-held remote control.

 

Dry Mix vs. Wet Mix

The dry mix method involves placing the dry ingredients into a hopper and then conveying them pneumatically through a hose to the nozzle. The nozzleman controls the addition of water at the nozzle. The water and the dry mixture is not completely mixed, but is completed as the mixture hits the receiving surface. This requires a skilled nozzleman, especially in the case of thick or heavily reinforced sections. Advantages of the dry mix process are that the water content can be adjusted instantaneously by the nozzleman, allowing more effective placement in overhead and vertical applications without using accelerators. The dry mix process is useful in repair applications when it is necessary to stop frequently, as the dry material is easily discharged from the hose.

Wet-mix shotcrete involves pumping of a previously prepared concrete, typically ready-mixed concrete, to the nozzle. Compressed air is introduced at the nozzle to impel the mixture onto the receiving surface. The wet-process procedure generally produces less rebound, waste [when material falls to the floor], and dust compared to the dry-mix process. The greatest advantage of the wet-mix process is all the ingredients are mixed with the water and additives required, and also larger volumes can be placed in less time than the dry process.

 

Shotcrete Machinery & Equipment

Shotcrete machines are available which control complete process and made it very fast and easy. Manual and mechanical methods are used for the wet spraying process, but wet sprayed concrete is traditionally applied by machine. The high spray outputs and large cross-sections require the work to be mechanised. Concrete spraying systems with duplex pumps are mainly used for working with wet mixes. Unlike conventional concrete pumps, these systems have to meet the additional requirement of delivering a concrete flow that is as constant as possible, and therefore continuous, to guarantee homogeneous spray application'.

 

Shotcrete vs. Gunite Applications

Shotcrete is an all-inclusive term that describes spraying concrete or mortar with either a dry or wet mix process. However, shotcrete may also sometimes be used [incorrectly] to distinguish wet-mix from the dry-mix method. The term shotcrete was first defined by the American Railway Engineers Association [AREA] in the early 1930s. By 1951, shotcrete had become the official generic name of the sprayed concrete process—whether it utilizes the wet or dry process.

Gunite was, at one time, a trademarked name that specifically refers to the dry-mix shotcrete process. In the dry-mix process, the dry sand and cement mixture is blown through a hose using compressed air, with water being injected at the nozzle to hydrate the mixture, immediately before it is discharged onto the receiving surface. Gunite was the original term coined by Akeley, trademarked in 1909 and patented in North Carolina. The concrete mixture is by pneumatic pressure from a gun, hence "gun"-ite.

The term "Gunite" became the registered trademark of Allentown Equipment, the oldest manufacturer of gunite equipment. Other manufacturers were thus compelled to use other terminology to describe the process such as shotcrete, pneumatic concrete, guncrete, etc.

Shotcrete has emerged as the all-inclusive industry term to correctly describe "pneumatically applied concrete," either by the wet or dry process. The term "Gunite" is a noun [product name] and should not be used as a verb [as in, to "gunite" something]. According to the American Shotcrete Association [ASA], the correct terminology is "shotcrete—wet mix" or "shotcrete—dry mix."

 

 


 

 

SOIL NAILING AS SLOPE RETENTION AND ENHANCED ORNAMENTATION
STRUCTURAL RETAINING WALL APPLICATION

Soil nailing is a construction technique that can be used as a remedial measure to treat unstable natural soil slopes or as a construction technique that allows the safe over-steepening of new or existing soil slopes.

The technique involves the insertion of relatively slender reinforcing elements into the slope – often general purpose reinforcing bars [rebar] although proprietary solid or hollow-system bars are also available.

 

Solid bars are usually installed into pre-drilled holes and then grouted into place using a separate grout line, whereas hollow bars may be drilled and grouted simultaneously by the use of a sacrificial drill bit and by pumping grout down the hollow bar as drilling progresses.

Kinetic methods of firing relatively short bars into soil slopes have also been developed. Bars installed using drilling techniques are usually fully grouted and installed at a slight downward inclination with bars installed at regularly spaced points across the slope face. A rigid facing [often pneumatically applied concrete, otherwise known as shotcrete] or isolated soil nail head plates may be used at the surface. Alternatively a flexible reinforcing mesh may be held against the soil face beneath the head plates. Rabbit proof wire mesh and environmental erosion control fabrics and may be used in conjunction with flexible mesh facing where environmental conditions dictate.

Soil nail components may also be used to stabilize retaining walls or existing fill slopes[embankments and levees]; this is normally undertaken as a remedial measure.

Since its first application using modern techniques in Versailles in 1972, soil nailing is now a well-established technique around the world. One of the first national guideline publications for soil nailing was produced in Japan in 1987. The U.S. Federal Highway Administration issued guideline publications in 1996 and 2003.

 

 

TBNC Eagle Canyon Lodge Linear Waterwall Land + waterworks Ruidoso new Mexico USA

 

Preliminary Analysis

Four [4] main points to be considered in determining if soil nailing would be an effective retention technique are as follows.

First, the existing ground conditions should be examined.

Next, the advantages and disadvantages for a soil nail wall should be assessed for the particular application being considered. Then other systems should be considered for the particular application.

Finally, cost of the soil nail wall should be considered.

Soil nail walls can be used for a variety of soil types and conditions. The most favorable conditions for soil nailing are as follows:

The soil should be able to stand unsupported one [1] to two [2] meters high for a minimum of two [2] days when cut vertical or nearly vertical. Also all soil nails within a cross section should be located above the groundwater table. If the soil nails are not located above the groundwater table, the groundwater should not negatively affect the face of the excavation, the bond between the ground and the soil nail itself.

Based upon these favorable conditions for soil nailing stiff to hard fine-grained soils which include stiff to hard clays, clayey silts, silty clays, sandy clays, and sandy silts are preferred soils. Sand and gravels which are dense to very dense soils with some apparent cohesion also work well for soil nailing. Weathered rock is also acceptable as long as the rock is weathered evenly throughout(meaning no weakness planes). Finally, glacial soils work well for soil nailing.

A list of unfavorable or difficult soil conditions for soil nailing can include dry, poorly graded cohesion-less soils, soils with a high groundwater table, soils with cobbles and boulders, soft to very soft fine-grained soils, highly corrosive soils, weathered rock with unfavorable weakness planes, and loess.

Other difficult conditions include prolonged exposure to freezing temperatures, a climate that has a repeated freeze-and-thaw cycle, and granular soils that are very loose.

 

Origination of Soil Nailing

Soil nailing evolved from the New Austrian Tunneling method which is a system for underground excavations in rock. This method consists of passive steel reinforcement in the rock followed by the application of reinforced shotcrete. This concept of combining passive steel reinforcement and shotcrete has also been applied to the stabilization of rock slopes since the early 1960s.

The first application of soil nailing was implemented in 1972 for a railroad widening project near Versailles, France. Soil nails were used to stabilize an eighteen [18 m] metre high slope consisting of sandy soil. This method proved to be more cost-effective, while at the same time cut down the construction time when compared to other conventional support methods.

Germany was the next country to investigate soil nailing. From 1975 to 1981 the University of Karlsruhe and the construction company Bauer collaborated to establish a research program. This program conducted full scale testing of experimental walls with different configurations and developed analysis procedures for use in design.

The United States first used soil nailing in 1976 for the support of a 13.7 metre deep foundation excavation in dense silty sands. Soil nailing was implemented in the expansion of The Good Samaritan Hospital in Portland, Oregon. This retaining system was produced in approximately half the time at about eighty-five [85%] percent of the cost of conventional retaining systems.

 

Segmental Retaining Walls [SRW]

Segmental Retaining Walls [SRW] are modular block retaining walls used for vertical grade change applications. The walls are designed and constructed as either gravity retaining walls [conventional] or reinforced soil retaining walls. The system consists of dry-cast concrete units that are placed without mortar [dry stacked] and rely on their unit to unit interface and mass to resist overturning and sliding.  

Unit to unit interfaces include friction, shear elements, and interlock. The systems may also employ soil reinforcement that extends into the backfill and allows for the construction of walls with significant height [e.g. in excess of fifty [50'] feet [15.24 m] that could not be accomplished with the units alone.

Segmental Retaining Walls are considered flexible structures, so the footing does not need to be placed below the frost line, provided there is sufficient foundation bearing capacity. SRW units are manufactured in conformance with industry standards and specifications to assure that units delivered to a project are uniform in weight, dimensional tolerances, strength, and durability—features not necessarily provided in site cast materials.

 

Lateral Earth Pressure [LEP] Discussion

Designing any retaining wall requires a knowledge of Lateral Earth Pressure [LEP], the pressure developed by the backfill. It is the force generated by the LEP that constitutes a large part of the load that the wall must carry.

To determine the LEP acting against the retaining wall, several soil parameters must be known in order for the qualified engineer to assess a particular wall design and its overall stability:

· Soil Unit Weight

· Angle of Internal Friction of the Soil

· Cohesion and Plasticity Indices for Cohesive Soils [for instance, clays]

· Water Table Location

Once the Lateral Earth Pressures [LEP] are known, the wall is checked for stability. This includes checks for wall overturning, base sliding, and soil bearing capacity failures.

Improper wall design and installation results in failures of retaining walls.

By understanding how a wall works, and how it can fail, it is possible to engineer a retaining structure that will meet all foreseen environmental, structural and construction demands.

 

Backfill Drainage Issues

One area that can be commonly overlooked, or at least underestimated, is the necessity to drain the backfill of rainwater and/or groundwater. Hydrostatic pressure can cause or induce retaining wall failure, or at least damage the wall.

Drainage of water as a result of rainfall or other wet conditions is very important to the stability of a retaining wall. Without proper drainage the backfill can become saturated, which has the dual impact of increasing the pressure on the wall and lessening the resistance of the backfill material to sliding.

Granular backfill material offers the benefits of good drainage, easy compaction, and increased sliding resistance.

 

Weepholes and Drainage Lines

Drainage systems usually utilize weepholes and drainage lines.

Weepholes actually penetrate the retaining wall and drain the area immediately behind the wall. Weepholes should have a minimum diameter so as to permit free drainage; for large walls, four [4"] inch weepholes are common.

Adequate spacing between weepholes allows uniform drainage from behind the wall.

Weepholes should always have some kind of filter material between the wall and the backfill to prevent fines migration, weephole clogging, and loss of backfill and caving.

Drainage lines are often perforated and wrapped in geotextile or buried in a granular filter bed, and serve to carry water to the weepholes from areas deeper within the backfill.

 

 

ECL.RNM.TBNC Eagle Canyon Lodge Linera Waterfeature + Waterwall Plan View Draft

 

 

 

 

TBNC TDG.SD La Jolla LJVTSC.Waterfeature Land+Waterworks Draft Elevation Domed Round Element Draft Elevation

PROPOSED MEZZANINE SITED FEATURE - LA JOLLA - CALIFORNIA

 

 

PRODUCTION PLAN SET - THREE SHEETS [3] OF SIX [6]

TBNC + TDG.SD Land + Waterworks La Jolla Town Square Village Waterfeature Plan Set Exhibit Round Puppy with Levels USA

Figure WF. 01
ELEVATION - STRUCTURAL SECTION
CONSTRUCTION APPLICATIONS + DETAILS + NOTES

 

 

TBNC L+Waterworks TDG.SD Waterfeature Exhibit LJVTS.Round Mound Feature Plan Set La Jolla, California USA Fountain Plan Set Sheet 03 USA TBNC L+Waterworks Representational Round Dome Waterfeature La Jolla Village Towne Square, California TDG.SD Plan Set Sheet 04 USA

Figure WF. 02
PLAN VIEW - HYDRAULIC SECTION
HYDRAULIC DETAILS + NOTES

Figure WF. 03
UTILITIES PLAN - HYDRAULIC PLAN
CONSTRUCTION DETAILS + NOTES

   

 

 

TBNC Land + Waterworks Representational Domed Circular Waterfeature La Jolla Viillage Towne Square TDG.SD Draft Plot Plan Study USA

 

 

 

 

 

Aquatic Parklands Vignette
A Prototypical Man-Made Waterfeature Created Within a Riparian Drainage Basin

Carlsbad · California · USA

 


Study Credit

Aquatic gardening is concerned with growing plants adapted to pools and ponds.

They can be defined as any interior or exterior landscape or architectural element whose primary purpose is to incorporate, display, or propagate a particular species or variety of aquatic plant. The primary focus is on plants, but they will sometimes also house ornamental fish, in which case the feature will be a fish pond.

 

Although Aquatic Features can be almost any size or depth, they are typically small and relatively shallow, generally less than twenty [20"] inches in depth. This is because most aquatic plants are depth sensitive and require a specific water depth in order to thrive. The particular species inhabiting each water garden will ultimately determine the actual surface area and depth required.

When the aquatic flora and fauna are balanced, an aquatic ecosystem is created that will support sustainable water quality and clarity.

Elements such as fountains, statues, waterfalls, boulders, underwater lighting, lining treatments, edging details, watercourses, and in-water and bankside planting can add visual interest and help to integrate the water garden with the local landscape and environment.

 

Built Feature - SWMP Commercial Applications Drainage Retention Basin

Ralph M. Wrisley Memorial Park

a parkland & a weddingplace

Carlsbad · California · USA

 

NATURAL GRANITIC BOULDERS HEADWALL & STEPPED RECIRCULATION OUTFALL

TBNC Tom Edgemon Land + Waterworks Weddingplace @ SWMP Retention Basin Palomar Airport Road Carlsbad, California Edgemon CSLB CA. 274107 Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers USA Edgemon CRQ TBNC Tom Edgemon CA. CSLB 274107 California Contractor Plus Land + Waterworks SWMP Retention Basin Wedding Place on Palomar Airport Road CRQ Edgemon Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers CA USA

View Across Reflective Collector Reservoir
to Weir Fashioned Granitic Boulder Placement
Reservoir Overflow Receptor Lower Left Image

View Across to Weir Fashioned Granitic Boulder Placement
Recirculating Water Flow by Hydraulic System
Friendly White Egret at Launch

   

 

Riparian Habitat Zone Discussion


STUDY CREDIT

A riparian zone or riparian area is the interface between land and a river or stream.

Riparian is also the proper nomenclature for one of the fifteen [15] terrestrial biomes of the earth.

Plant habitats and communities along the river margins and banks are called riparian vegetation, characterized by hydrophilic plants.

 

Riparian zones are important in ecology, environmental management, and civil engineering because of their role in soil conservation, their habitat biodiversity, and the influence they have on fauna and aquatic ecosystems, including grasslands, woodlands, wetlands, or even non-vegetative areas.

In some regions the terms riparian woodland, riparian forest, riparian buffer zone, and riparian strip are used to characterize a riparian zone. The word riparian is derived from Latin ripa, meaning river bank.

 

Characteristics of Riparian Habitat Zones

Riparian zones may be natural or engineered for soil stabilization or restoration.

These zones are important natural biofilters, protecting aquatic environments from excessive sedimentation, polluted surface runoff and erosion. They supply shelter and food for many aquatic animals and shade that limits stream temperature change.

When riparian zones are damaged by construction, agriculture or silviculture, biological restoration can take place, usually by human intervention in erosion control and revegetation.

If the area adjacent to a watercourse has standing water or saturated soil for as long as a season, it is normally termed a wetland because of its hydric soil characteristics. Because of their prominent role in supporting a diversity of species, riparian zones are often the subject of national protection in a Biodiversity Action Plan [BAP] . These are also known as a "Plant or Vegetation Waste Buffer".

Research shows that riparian zones are instrumental in water quality improvement for both surface runoff and water flowing into streams through subsurface or groundwater flow.

Riparian zones can play a role in lowering nitrate contamination in surface runoff, such as manure and other fertilizers from agricultural fields, that would otherwise damage ecosystems and human health. Particularly the attenuation of nitrate or denitrification of the nitrates from fertilizer in this buffer zone is important.

The use of wetland riparian zones shows a particularly high rate of removal of nitrate entering a stream and thus has a place in agricultural management.

 

 

 

Aquatic Gardens, and Waterfeatures in general, have been a part of public and private gardens since ancient Persian gardens and Chinese gardens. For instance, the [c. 304] Nanfang Caomu Zhuang records cultivating Chinese spinach on floating gardens.

Waterfeatures have been present and well represented in every era and in every culture that has included gardens in their landscape and architectural environments.

Up until the rise of the industrial age, when the modern water pump was introduced, water was not recirculated but was diverted from rivers and springs into the water garden, from which it exited into agricultural fields or natural watercourses.

Historically, water features were used to enable plant and fish production both for food purposes and for ornamental aesthetics.

Though the term "Aquatic Garden" is normally used to describe a particular type of natural or man-made water feature that is used for a relatively specific purpose, there are many other types, styles and designs of waterfeature.

 

SITE CONFIGURED SWMP DRAINAGE BASIN AS WATERFEATURE

TBNC Land + Waterworks Carlsbad Wddingplace at Enhanced SWMP Water Reservoir, Environmental Planning & Site Design & Engineering Edgemon CA CSLB 274107 USA TBNC Edgemon Environmental Planners, Site Designers & Engineers, Creators of Wdddingplaces, Parks & Beautiful Living Environments USA Edgemon CSLB 274107

Park Wrisley Record Image 01

Vertical Water Jet Fountain with Hydraulic Control
Center Image at Base of Granitic Boulder Stack
View Northeasterly from Grassy Parkland

Park Wrisley Record Image 02

SWMP Reservoir Overflow Drain Receptor
Image Left, View from Grassy Parkland
Natural Boulders - View Northeasterly

   
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks Weddingplace Retention Basin Enhancement Program, Edgemon CSLB 274107 Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers California Edgemon USA

Park Wrisley Record Image 03

Friendly Egret Monitoring Reservoir Overflow Drain Receptor at Image Center
Overflow Stormwater Discharges to Municipal System

   
   

 

Representational Riparian Habitat Repair and Restoration

Land clearing followed by floods can quickly erode a riverbank, taking valuable grasses and soils downstream, and later allowing the sun to bake the land dry.

Natural Sequence Farming techniques have been used in the Upper Hunter Valley of New South Wales, Australia, in an attempt to rapidly restore eroded farms to optimum productivity.

The Natural Sequence Farming technique involves placing obstacles in the water's pathway to lessen the energy of a flood, and help the water to deposit soil and seep into the flood zone. Another technique is to quickly establish ecological succession by encouraging fast-growing plants such as "weeds" (pioneer species) to grow. These may spread along the watercourse and cause environmental degradation but may stabilize the soil, place carbon into the ground, and protect the land from drying. The weeds will improve the streambeds so that trees and grasses can return, and later ideally replace the weeds. There are several other techniques used by government and non-government agencies to address riparian and streambed degradation, ranging from the installation of bed control structures such as log sills to the use of pin groynes or rock emplacement.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks High Bluff Office Campus Courtyard Waterfeature 92 Unit Elevation View Reconn @ 05.12.11 North San Diego, California USA     TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks High Bluff MoFo 92 Unit Waterfeature As Built Recording @ 05.12.11 MoFo North San Siego, California USA

PROFESSIONAL CLASS A OFFICE CAMPUS
San Diego · California · USA

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks High Bluff 92 Courtyard Built Exhibit North San Diego, California USA

 

FEATURE & SITE DEVELOPMENT CONSTRUCTION DRAWINGS

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks Creative Waterfeature High Bkuff Office Campus North San Diego, California USA TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks High Bluff Campus Dramatic Feature North San Diego, California USA

L+W.HB92.WF.TDG..101
TBNC.WF.D+E.127.F16.A

MASTER SITE PLAN

L+W.HB92.WF.TDG..102
TBNC.WF.D+E.127.F16.B

SECTION STUDIES

   
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks High Bluff Office Campus North San Diego, California USA TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks High Bluff Office Campus Dramatic Feature Study North San Diego, California USA

L+W.HB92.WF.TDG..103
TBNC.WF.D+E.127.F16.C

HYDRAULICS PLAN
ELECTRICAL PLAN

L+W.HB92.WF.TDG..105
TBNC.WF.D+E.127.F16.D

SPECIFIC DETAILS
SPECIFICATIONS

   
   

 

 
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks High Bluff Office Campus Dramatic Feature Study, North San Diego County, California USA

L+W.HB92.WF.TDG..106
TBNC.WF.D+E.127.F16.E

SPECIFIC CONSTRUCTION DETAILS

 

 

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks High Bluff Office Campus Tiered Feature, North San Diego, Califorina USA

 

 

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks High Bluff 92 Office Campus Courtyard Feature Reconn @ 05.12.11 North San Diego, California USA

STONE CLAD FEATURE DOME @ CAMPUS CENTER · IMAGE VIEW SOUTHERLY

 

    TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks High Bluff Office Campus Courtyard 92 Waterfeature As Built Recordings Site Reconn  @ 05.12.11 North San Diego, California USA

LINEAR STREAMBED VIEW TO CENTER COURT FEATURE DOME
Image View Easterly

 

 

 

COURSE OF CONSTRUCTION IMAGE RECORDINGS

Pre-Construction Site Exhibit

Initial Site Rough Grade Preparation

Center Dome Rough Grade Contour

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks 92 High Bluff Representational Construction Photographic Exhibits Archive Cnstruction North San Diego, California USA
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks HB 92 Courtyard High Bluff Construction Studies Record North San Diego, California USA
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks Representational Construction Job Progress File Photography High Bluff 92 Courtyard North San Diego, California USA

L+W.HBWF.Ext.CoC.IR.0033

Figure HB.001

L+W.HBWF.Ext.CoC.IR.0058

Figure HB.002

L+W.HBWF.Ext.CoC.IR.0103

Figure HB.003

     

Feature Reservoir Rough-Out Excavation

Crane Application Boulder Placement

Crane Application Boulder Placement

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks Representational Waterfeature Construction Progress Photography @ High Bluff Office Campus, North San Diego, Califoria USA  HB.92.L-W.C.003R
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks High Bluff Office Campus North San Diego, Significant Boulder Placement Recordings, Courtyear Waterfeature, California USA HB.92.L+W.WF.Cy.001
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks High Bluff Office Campus Significant Boulder Placement by Crane Photographic Exhibits, HB.92.CY.WF North San Diego, California USA

L+W.HBWF.Ext.CoC.IR.0151

Figure HB.004

L+W.HBWF.Ext.CoC.IR.0331

Figure HB.005

L+W.HBWF.Ext.CoC.IR.0363

Figure HB.006

     

Boulder Rough-Out Placement Recording

Feature Dome Shotcrete Application

Feature Reservoir Shotcrete Application

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks High Bluff Courtyrad HB.92.WF.CY Progressive Construction File Recordings, North San Diego, California USA
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks High Bluff Office Campus Courtyard Waterfeature Shotcrete Application Recording Construction Exhibits, North San Diego, California USA
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks High Bluff Office Campus Courtyard Waterfeature Progressive File Photographs Shotcrete Application, HB.92.CY.001 North San Diego, California USA

L+W.HBWF.Ext.CoC.IR.0418

Figure HB.007

L+W.HBWF.Ext.CoC.IR.0468

Figure HB.008

L+W.HBWF.Ext.CoC.IR.0499

Figure HB.009

     

Conformed Feature @ Rough-Out

Equipment Vault Foundation

Equipment Vault Fabrication

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks High Bluff 92 Courtyard @ Office Campus Progressive Construction Recordings, Shotcrete Application, North San Diego, California USA

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks High Bluff Office Campus Vault Foundation Photographic Recording, HB.92.CY.L+W.Edgemon North San Diego, California USA

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks High Bluff Office Campus Waterfeature Equipment Vault Construction, Progressive File Photographic Recordings, Courtyard System North San Diego, California USA

L+W.HBWF.Ext.CoC.IR.0587

Figure HB.010

L+W.HBWF.Ext.CoC.IR.0612

Figure HB.011

L+W.HBWF.Ext.CoC.IR.0799

Figure HB.012

     

Feature Dome Stone Surface Application

Feature Detail & Trim Fabrication

Substantial Completion View

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks High Bluff Office Campus Courtyard Waterfeature Progressive File Photographs, Construction Exhibits, North San Diego, California USA
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks High Bluff Office Campus Courtyard Waterfeature Progressive Consstruction Photographic Recordings HB.92.WF.L+W. Claddings Record, North San Diego, California USA
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks High Bluff Office Campus 92.WF Waterfeature Progressive Recordings Site Construction Edgemon North San Diego, California USA

L+W.HBWF.Ext.CoC.IR.0963

Figure HB.013

L+W.HBWF.Ext.CoC.IR.1053

Figure HB.014

L+W.HBWF.Ext.CoC.IR.1171

Figure HB.015

     

Substantial Completion View

Substantial Completion View

Substantial Completion View

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks High Bluff Office Campus HB.92.CY Progressive Construction Photographic Recordings, North San Diego, California USA
TBNC EdgemonLand + Waterworks High Bluff Office Campus Courtyard Waterfeature Progressive Construction Recordings Edgemon North San Diego, California USA
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks High Bluff Office Campus Significant Courtyard Waterfeature Progressive Construction File Recordings, North San Diego, California USA

L+W.HBWF.Ext.CoC.IR.1106

Figure HB.016

L+W.HBWF.Ext.CoC.IR.1202

Figure HB.017

L+W.HBWF.Ext.CoC.IR.1242

Figure HB.018

     
     

 


 

 

CONCEPTUAL PLANNING  ·    SERIES OF SITE SPECIFIC WATERFEATURES

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks Conceptual Site Planning Waterfeature Elements California USA Environmentla Planning, Edgemon 274107

 

 

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks World Reknown Waterfeatures Site & Land Planning, Environmental Engineering & Construction Management California USA Edgemon 274107

 

TBNC Edgemon California Land + Waterworks Site Specific Waterfeature Design, Engineering & Environmental Planning TDG.SD.LCTS.CRQ.Edgemon 274107 USA

 

ARCHITECTURAL SITE PLANNING    ·    WATERFEATURE SURFACE & TRIM APPLICATIONS

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks Conceptual Study Waterfeature Planning & Site Engineering, Conceptual Studies, California USA Edgemon

 

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks Waterfeatures & Significant Aquatic Elements California + Mexico, Design, Engineer & Construct Edgemon CA CSLB 274107

 


 

 

VALUABLE WEB-PRESENCE SITE PLANNING & LANDSCAPE DESIGN RESOURCE

VISIT DSS OFF-SITE
@
www.decorativestonesolutions.com

 

Representational Applications Exhibit
UCSD BLAKE HALL

An Interior Courtyard

UCSD BLAKE HALL · SITE DEVELOPMENT CREDITS

Environmental Design · Landscape Architecture
California RLA 4654

www.land-lab.com
858.483.9817
702 Wrelton Drive · San Diego · California 92109

Installing Landscape Contractor
CSLB # 133947 + # 266211

www.brightview.com
855.873.3852
8500 Miramar Place · San Diego· CA 92121

   

 

 

 

 

 

Site Plan Engineering & Front-End Loading


STUDY CREDIT

Site Planning Engineering [SPE] and Front-End Loading [FEL], also referred to as Pre-Project Planning [PPP], Front-End Engineering Design [FEED], Feasibility Analysis, Conceptual Planning, Programming / Schematic Design [PSD] and Early Project Planning [EPP], is the process for conceptual development of projects in processing industries such as upstream, petrochemical, refining and pharmaceutical. This involves developing sufficient strategic information with which Program Owners can address risk and make decisions to commit resources in order to maximize the potential for success.

Front-End loading includes robust planning and design early in a project's lifecycle [i.e., the front end of a project], at a time when the ability to influence changes in design is relatively high and the cost to make those changes is relatively low. It typically applies to industries with highly capital intensive, long lifecycle projects [i.e., hundreds of millions or billions of dollars over several years before any revenue is produced]. Though it often adds a small amount of time and cost to the early portion of a project, these costs are minor compared to the alternative of the costs and effort required to make changes at a later stage in the project.

It also typically uses a Stage-Gate Process [SGP], whereby a project must pass through formal gates at well defined milestones within the project's lifecycle before receiving funding to proceed to the next stage of work. The quality of front-end planning can be improved through the use of Project Definition Rating Index [PDRI] as a part of the Stage-Gate Process.

 

TBNC Tom Edgemon California & Mexico Land + Waterworks Program Ancient Indian Conical Waterfeatures Edgemon CA.CSLB 274107 Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers Mexioc Tooo,,,

Tres pirámides volcánicas con fuego y azufre
Los niños ten mucho cuidado

 

 


 

 

 

TBNC Edgemon Land + waterworks California Tom Edgemon CA.CSLB 274107 Edgemon Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers, La Costa Town Square Southern California Office USA

 

TBNC Edgemon LCTS Land + Waterworks Tom Edgemon CA.CSLB Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers California Office Edgemon 274107

 

TBNC Edgemon Land + waterworks, La Costa Towne Square, Edgemon CSLB 274107 Edgemon Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers, California Offices USA Edgemon

La Costa Town Square is San Diego North County's newest shopping center, located at the intersection of La Costa Avenue and Rancho Santa Fe Road in Carlsbad, California. 

The attached web-linkage provides the latest information on stores, restaurants, banks and other services featured in this shopping center.

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks California Office Tom Edgemon CA.CSLB 274107 Edgemon Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers San Diego Office, California Edgemon USA

www.lacostatownsquare.com

   

 

TBNC PRODUCTION PLAN SET
FOUR [4] WATERFEATURES @ LA COSTA TOWN SQUARE

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks California Edgemon Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers Tom Edgemon CA.CSLB 274107 Carlsbad, California USA

 

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks California Tom Edgemon CA.CSLB 274107 Edgemon Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers San Diego Field Office Edgemon USA

 

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks California Tom Edgemon CA.CSLB 274107 Edgemon Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Mangers, San Diego Field Office Edgemon USA

 

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks California Tom Edgemon CA.CSLB 274107 Edgemon Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction managers, San Diego Field Office California Edgemon USA

 

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks California Tom Edgemon Contractor 274107 CSLB Edgemon Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers San Diego Field Office Edgemon USA

 

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks California Tom Edgemon Contracxtor 274107 Edgemon Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers San Diego Field Office Edgemon USA

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks Tom Edgemon Contractor No. 274107 Edgemon Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers, Carlsbad, California USA

www.sca-sd.com

13280 evening creek drive south | suite 125 | san diego 92128 | 858.793.4777

 

 


 

 

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks La Jolla Water Feature Remediation / Restoration Study Edgemon CSLB 274107 Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers and Construction Mangers Edgemon CA>CSLB 274107 California USA

Task Order

 

The Plaza - La Jolla Village Building

TBNC Edgemon Land + waterworks La Jolla Plaza Waterfeature Remediation Study Edgemon CA.CSLB 274107 Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers, California USA Edgemon

REHABILITATION PLANNING & RECONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING
MATURE WATERFEATURE - SAN DIEGO - CALIFORNIA USA

 

SECTION 01 : MASTER SITE PLAN
EXISTING CONDITIONS & SITE RECONNSAINCE RECORDINGS
SITE SPECIFIC STUDY COMPONENTS

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks, Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers, Waterfeature Remediation La Jolla Village Town Center, Equity Office Study Program Edgemon CSB 274107 California USA

 

 

 

EXISTING CONDITIONS IMAGE RECORDINGS

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks Edgemon CA.CSLB 274107 Equity Office Waterfeature Remediation Study, La Jolla Town Village Edgemon Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers California USA TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks Equity Office Waterfeature Reemdiation Study, La Jolla, California, a Commercial Village, Edgemon CA.CSLB 274107 Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers, Watefeature Development California USA

TBNC.WF.Reconn.RM.TDG.SD.13.R.009

Figure 1.2

TBNC.WF.Reconn.RM.TDG.SD.13.R.023

Figure 1.3

View Southeasterly Through Upper Reflective Basin
to Primary Source Natural Stone Boulders Waterfall

View Northerly Through Upper Reflective Basin From
Primary Source Natural Stone Boulders Waterfall

 

 

 

SECTION 01 : EXISTING CONDITIONS & SITE RECONNSAINCE RECORDINGS
SITE SPECIFIC STUDY COMPONENTS

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks, Equity Office La Jolla, California Waterfeature Remediation Study, Edgemon 274107 Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers, La Jolla Towne Village Center, California USA

FIGURE 1.10
Archive Retrieval \ Origin Records 15 July, 1986

Representational Installation Methodologies
Waterfeature Membrane Liner and Conductor Boot Application

 

 

 

SECTION 01 : EXISTING CONDITIONS & SITE RECONNSAINCE RECORDINGS
SITE SPECIFIC STUDY COMPONENTS

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks, Equity Office Corporation, La Jolla Class A Waterfeature Remediation Studies, La Jolla, California USA Edgemon CA.CSLB 274107 Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers, California USA

FIGURE 1.11
Archive Retrieval \ Origin Records 15 July, 1986

Representational Installation Methodologies
Waterfeature Membrane Liner and Perimeter Joinings & Terminus

 

 

 

SECTION 01
PRIMARY HYDRAULIC DISTRIBUTION SITE PLAN
EXISTING CONDITIONS & SITE RECONNSAINCE RECORDINGS
SITE SPECIFIC STUDY COMPONENTS

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks La Jolla Equity Office Waterfeature Reemdiation Study / Site Restoration Edgemon Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers California USA

FIGURE 1.8
Archive Retrieval \ Origin Records 15 July, 1986

Representational Installation Methodologies
Waterfeature Hydraulics Systems & Hardware Applications

 

 

 

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks Edgemon Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers, Water Feature Remediation Study La Jolla, California
FIGURE 1.8.B2
STACKED & CEMENTITIOUS SEALED GRANITIC BOULDER APPLICATION
Image Credit Teshima Design Group [TDG] · San Diego

 

 

 

SECTION 01 : EXISTING CONDITIONS & SITE RECONNSAINCE RECORDINGS
SITE SPECIFIC STUDY COMPONENTS

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks La Jolla, California Equity Office Toiwne Centre Waterfeature Remediation Study, Edgemon 274107 CA.CSLB Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers California USA

FIGURE 1.8
Archive Retrieval \ Origin Records 15 July, 1986

Representational Installation Methodologies
Waterfeature Cementitious [Gunite] Applications

 

 

 

SECTION 01 : EXISTING CONDITIONS & SITE RECONNSAINCE RECORDINGS
SITE SPECIFIC STUDY COMPONENTS

Subsection : 3.0 Structural & Operational Functionality

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks La Jolla Equity Office La Jolla Village Plaza Waterfetaure Reemdiation / Recovery Study Edgemon 274107 Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers California USA Edgemon

Figure 3.5R
Representational Section Study - Elevated Freeboard Application

Encapsulated Perimeter Drainage System with Granular Aggregate

 

 

 

SECTION 01 : EXISTING CONDITIONS & SITE RECONNSAINCE RECORDINGS
SITE SPECIFIC STUDY COMPONENTS

Subsection : 3.0 Structural & Operational Functionality

Subsection 3.3R : Water Stagnation & Site Odor Control
Area Conjoined with Donovan's Restaurant

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks La Jolla Equity Office, a Corporation Waterfeature Remediation Study, Leaks Everwhere, Edgemon 274107 California Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers, Waterfeature Redevelopment, La Jolla, California Edgemon USA

Figure 3.8R
Representational Site Planning Study - Lower Feature @ Donovan's
Enhanced & Supplemental Skimmers and Volume Circulation

 

 

 

SECTION 01 : EXISTING CONDITIONS & SITE RECONNSAINCE RECORDINGS
SITE SPECIFIC STUDY COMPONENTS

Subsection : 3.0 Structural & Operational Functionality

Subsection 3.3R : Water Stagnation & Site Odor Control
Area Conjoined with Donovan's Restaurant

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks La Jolla Equity Office Waterfeature Reemdiation Study, La Jolla Village Towne Centre Edgemon Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers, Construction Mangers, and Fixers of WEaterfeatures, California USA Edgemon

Figure 3.7
Representational Sectional Study - Lower Feature @ Donovan's
Enhanced & Supplemental Skimmers and Volume Circulation

 

 

 

SECTION 01 : EXISTING CONDITIONS & SITE RECONNSAINCE RECORDINGS
SITE SPECIFIC STUDY COMPONENTS

Subsection : 3.0 Structural & Operational Functionality

Subsection 3.3R : Water Stagnation & Site Odor Control
Area Conjoined with Donovan's Restaurant

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks La Jolla, California Equity Office Complex La Jolla Towne Village Center, or Whatever, Edgemon CSLB.CA 274107 Waterfeature Redevelpment, Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers, Construction Managers and so much more,,,USA

Figure 3.10
Representational Linear Sectional Study - Lower Feature @ Donovan's
Enhanced & Supplemental Skimmers and Volume Circulation

 

 

 

SECTION 01 : EXISTING CONDITIONS & SITE RECONNSAINCE RECORDINGS
SITE SPECIFIC STUDY COMPONENTS

Subsection : 3.0 Structural & Operational Functionality

Subsection 3.3R : Water Stagnation & Site Odor Control
Area Conjoined with Donovan's Restaurant

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks La Jolla, California Equity Office, a Corporation, La Jolla Village Towne Center Waterfeature Remediation Program, Edgemon Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers, Watefeature Creators, too, Edgemon CA.CSLB 274107 California USA

Figure 3.12
Representational Lateral Sectional Study - Lower Feature @ Donovan's
Enhanced & Supplemental Skimmers / Point Origin and Volume Circulation

 

 

 

EXISTING SITE STUDY CONDITIONS : SECTION No: 01.03

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks, La Jolla, California USA Equity Office Corporation Waterfeature Remediation Study, Edgemon CSLB 274107 Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers, Creators of Awesome Watrfeatures, too, Edgemon USA TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks La Jolla, California Equity Office Corporation La Jolla Towne Center Village Waterfeature Reemdiation Study, Edgemon CSLB 274107 Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers, California USA

TBNC.WF.Reconn.RM.TDG.SD.13.R.053

Figure 1.5

TBNC.WF.Reconn.RM.TDG.SD.13.R.066

Figure 1.7

View Northerly Through Lower Waterfeature Basin to Mid-Feature Waterfall at Central Zone Pedestrian Bridge

View Southwesterly Through Waterfeature Basin to Site of Donovan's Restaurant and Pedestrian Bridge and Feature Terminus

   
TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks La Jolla, California USA Equity Office La Jolla Village Town Center Complex Waterfeature Reemdiation Program, Edgemon Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers, Waterfeature Developers toooo, Edgemon CSLB 274107 California USA TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks La Jolla, California Equity Office La Jolla Towne Centre Village Waterfeature Remediation Studies, Edgemon 274107 Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers, Edgemon Waterfeature Creators and So Much More, California USA

TBNC.WF.Reconn.RM.TDG.SD.13.R.084

Figure 1.4

TBNC.WF.Reconn.RM.TDG.SD.13.R.114

Figure 1.5

View Northerly Through Mid-Feature Basin and Artistry Exhibit View
From Mid-Falls Feature at Central Zone Pedestrian Bridge

View Northeasterly Through Mid-Feature at Central Zone
Pedestrian Bridge Component

   

 

Site Specific Media Recognition · Equity Office Campus Site Development

TBNC Edgemon Land + Waterworks La Jolla Water Feature Remediation / Restoration Study Edgemon CSLB 274107 Environmental Planners, Site Designers, Engineers and Construction Mangers Edgemon CA>CSLB 274107 California USA

 

TBNC Edgemon Land + waterworks Significant Commercial Category Waterfeature Elements California, Nevada, Arizona, Tom Edgemon CA.CSLB 274107 Award Winning Recognition TBNC-Edgemon Environmental Planners, Designers, Engineers & Construction Managers

SITE SPECIFICALLY FEATURED


STUDY CREDIT

A Trade Magazine, also called a Trade Journal or Professional Magazine [and colloquially or disparagingly a Trade Rag], is a magazine whose target audience is people who work in a particular trade or industry. Its main goals are to keep members of the industry abreast of new developments [in which role it functions similarly to how academic journals, scientific journals, medical journals, and engineering journals serve their audiences] and to serve targeted advertising to them, which earns a profit for the publication and sales for the advertisers while also providing sales engineering–type advice to the readers, helping them with industrial purchasing and investment decisions.

The collective term for this area of publishing is the Trade Press
[
although that term sometimes also refers to publishers of trade paperbacks].

 

Trade magazines typically contain advertising content centered on the industry in question with little if any general-audience advertising. They also generally contain industry-specific job notices, a highly pertinent aspect to many readers.

For the print medium, most trade magazines operate on a type of subscription business model known as controlled circulation, in which the print subscription is free but is restricted only to subscribers who are what salespeople refer to as qualified leads.

Because the print medium costs substantial amounts of money [for printing and postage], the publishers cannot afford to hand out free copies to everyone who requests one [unqualified leads]; instead, they operate under controlled circulation, deciding who may receive free subscriptions based on each person's qualification as a member of the trade [and likelihood of buying, for example, likelihood of having corporate purchasing authority, as determined from job title]. This allows a high level of certainty that advertisements will be received by the advertiser's target audience, and it avoids wasted printing and distribution expenses.

 

Site Specific Media Recognition
LAKE TRW

San Diego Magazine is a monthly publication concerning life in the San Diego region.

It is the city’s longest running lifestyle publication. It is a member of the City and Regional Magazine Association [CRMA].

San Diego Magazine also publishes Exquisite Weddings Magazine, a biannual magazine for brides and wedding professionals in Southern California and surrounding regions.

 

BRIEF SAN DIEGO MAGAZINE HISTORY

San Diego Magazine was first published in 1948.

The publishers were Ed and Gloria Self, who also served as joint editors until they sold the title to Jim Fitzpatrick, former publisher of Entrepreneur Magazine, in 1994. It was acquired by CurtCo Media in 2005, who sold it to Desert Publications in 2010.

Jim Fitzpatrick then became CEO and Publisher again. San Diego Magazine is a member of the City and Regional Magazine Association.

Some of the magazine's special features and events include "Best of San Diego", "50 People to Watch", "Top Doctors in San Diego", and "Women Who Move the City".

 

THE CREATION OF

One Rancho Carmel · California · USA


Image Credit TOM EDGEMON
SAN DIEGO MAGAZINE

 

 

SITE DEVELOPMENT PLANNING & ENGINEERING

Course of Construction Image


STUDY CREDIT

Site planning in landscape architecture and architecture refers to the organizational stage of the landscape design process. It involves the organization of land use zoning, access, circulation, privacy, security, shelter, land drainage, and other factors.

This is done by arranging the compositional elements of landform, planting, water, buildings and paving in site plans.

 

Site planning generally begins by assessing a potential site for development through site analysis. Information about slope, soils, hydrology, vegetation, parcel ownership, orientation, etc. are assessed and mapped.

By determining areas that are poor for development [such as floodplain or steep slopes] and better for development, the planner or architect can assess optimal location and design a structure that works within this space.

Site planning is also one part of the Architect Registration Examination [ARE] in the United States and Canada.

 

 

 

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